‘Mister Miracle’ #12 | Comic Review

November 15, 2018
Louie Fecou 1
Comic Reviews, Comics
1

Summary

Mister Miracle #12 brings Tom King and Mitch Gerads to the end of their Eisner Award-winning run, but the one thing Scott Free can’t escape from is bad creative decisions from hot writers.

1

Summary

Mister Miracle #12 brings Tom King and Mitch Gerads to the end of their Eisner Award-winning run, but the one thing Scott Free can’t escape from is bad creative decisions from hot writers.

Mister Miracle #12 brings Tom King and Mitch Gerads to the end of their Eisner Award-winning run, and nobody cares.

So I’ve invested $3.99 a month in this 12-issue run, meaning I’ve splurged $47.88 on reading this book, and from all 12 issues, i think I can tell you maybe 2 two highlights.

That’s not a great track record.

When I think of other maxi series, such as Watchmen, V For Vendetta, Crisis on Infinite Earths, The Long Halloween, you name it, I can almost tell you specific details from every single issue. That’s a good series. Here however, the slow-burning meandering from King drags this story slowly into a treacle-filled swamp, and there is no escape, even for Mister Miracle.

The run starts with possibly the only enticing premise of the whole self-aggrandizing experience: Scott Free tried to kill himself. However, once you get by that frankly depressing opening gambit,  the whole thing just relentlessly grinds into a slow-paced crawl that seems more like therapy for King than anything else.

The whole 12-issue run is constantly referencing Jack Kirby’s concepts and characters, yet ironically there is absolutely no comparison between the two creators. King writes like a selfish and confused middle-aged man that is embarrassed by the original concepts of the character’s creator, so has decided that he will rewrite everything in his own image.

Big Barda, one of the strongest, most heroic female characters to ever grace comic book pages, is reduced to a lackluster soccer mom that is so bored by the very things that make us like her that she flippantly sidesteps any moments of real drama with random millennial speak that degrades and disassembles the initial concept of the character.

By the end of the series, i was so frustrated with the plodding and ambiguous plot that I neither cared or even tried to understand the metatextual dialogue that many people seem to be drooling over. Disagree? Then go ahead: try to explain the more subtle nuances of the 12 issues and see how far you get.

Mister Miracle cops out so badly in it’s last few issues that it’s impossible to even think of this as a DC comic book.

Mister Miracle is a bombastic, fun and exciting character, that exists in a universe populated by good and evil Gods that reflected the ideas of heaven and hell, good and evil, God and the Devil. it should be earth-shattering and dramatic, filled with epic battles that threaten the whole of reality.

Instead, we get this miserable, dreary, unfunny descent into King’s own neurosis, a theme that he seems to have carried through Batman and Heroes In Crisis.

This is comics deconstructed, but not in a clever Alan Moore way, but as a cynical and misjudged conceit that will make some people feel very clever for reading, but alienates the fans of the original concepts.

The one thing Scott Free can’t escape from is bad creative decisions from hot writers.

And if you’re wondering about the art, Gerads is brilliant, but even a lot of his stuff in this last issue looks rushed.