‘Titans’ Episode 8 – “Donna Troy” | Netflix TV Recap

January 10, 2019
Jonathon Wilson 0
Netflix, TV, TV Recaps
3.5

Summary

A bit self-indulgent it might be, but “Donna Troy” shows once again that Titans can effortlessly fold more of the DC Universe into its story.

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3.5

Summary

A bit self-indulgent it might be, but “Donna Troy” shows once again that Titans can effortlessly fold more of the DC Universe into its story.

This recap of Titans Episode 8, “Donna Troy”, contains spoilers. You can check out our thoughts on the previous episode by clicking these words.


At this point, Titans could be accused of showing off a little bit. After so much fuss was made over its marketing, and so many sceptical people – including me – were gradually proved wrong as each episode was released, the ease with which the show has consistently introduced fan-favourite elements from the broader DC continuity has continued to impress. First it was the Doom Patrol, then it was Jason Todd, and now it’s Donna Troy; the show’s freedom from network expectations and willingness to flaunt all of its bizarre comic-book trappings has become its greatest strength.

With the previous episode being so heavy on plot development, it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise given the show’s formula thus far that “Donna Troy” is another deviation into side-character territory, and the episode title once again gives the game away: Ladies and gentlemen, meet Wonder Girl (Conor Leslie).

You have to applaud the casting here once again. Leslie is beautiful and sassy and athletic and forceful, and has great on-screen chemistry with Brenton Thwaites, which should come as no surprise at this point. But what is surprising is that she’s the first woman of his general acquaintance who hasn’t thrown herself at him. On the contrary, he’s kind of deferential to her, which flashbacks explain as a kind of big-sister-little-brother dynamic that they developed growing up with superheroic crime-fighting “parents”.

“Wonder Woman was created to protect the innocent; Batman was created to punish the guilty” is a line that just about sums things up, and it also gives a sense of why Donna has been able to break free of her sidekick persona and move on to something else while Dick is still grappling with his former identity as Robin. Donna might be “older, smarter, and prettier,” by her own admission, but she was clearly also less scarred by her experiences as a vigilante. Their purely platonic relationship is immediately one of the best the show has offered thus far, and it makes for a lot of telling and fun interactions between the two of them.

These days Donna Troy fights the good fight as a photojournalist, and Dick’s misguided attempts to chivalrously intervene prove both that Donna is more than able to protect herself, and that slapping problems repeatedly isn’t the only way to solve them. This is the next step along Dick’s “becoming Nightwing” arc, and the next one occurs in Donna’s apartment when she points out that just because he can’t be Robin anymore doesn’t mean he has to stop being a vigilante. He just needs to become someone else. I wonder who that could be?

Sarcasm aside, the rest of the gang are moving into Angela’s (Rachel Nichols) out-of-the-way old house in Ohio, which first entails a train ride in which Kory (Anna Diop) gets made for a fugitive and has to cook their way free. There’s mention made of Rachel’s (Teagan Croft) dear old dad, who I’m sure we’ll hear more from given comics lore, and Gar (Ryan Potter) gets legless. It’s a jolly old time.

But the laidback barbequing of law enforcement can’t last. Just as Donna stumbles across Dick’s photos of Kory’s conspiracy container, Rachel tries to help Kory recover her memories through her miraculous not-at-all demonic healing powers. They both make the same discovery at the same time: Starfire is here on Earth to kill Raven.

Cliffhanger!

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