‘Deadly Class’ Episode 3 – “Snake Pit” | TV Recap

February 13, 2019
Jonathon Wilson 1
TV, TV Recaps
4

Summary

In “Snake Pit”, the best episode of Deadly Class thus far, we get a glimpse of who’s really in charge of King’s Dominion, and enjoy the welcome catharsis of the bad guys getting some comeuppance.

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4

Summary

In “Snake Pit”, the best episode of Deadly Class thus far, we get a glimpse of who’s really in charge of King’s Dominion, and enjoy the welcome catharsis of the bad guys getting some comeuppance.

This recap of Deadly Class Episode 3, “Snake Pit”, contains spoilers. You can check out our thoughts on the previous episode by clicking these words.


In “Snake Pit”, Deadly Class wisely spares time for characters other than Miserable Marcus (Benjamin Wadsworth), and to my delight devotes plenty of attention to Viktor (Sean Depner), one of my new favourite Generic Russian Stereotype characters. This can only be a good thing.

And it is a good thing. In last week’s strong “Noise, Noise, Noise”, Viktor did the no-pants-dance with the antisocial goth poison expert Petra (Taylor Hickson), and despite the liaison occurring at a house party where it’s basically anything goes, “Snake Pit” shows Viktor to be harbouring very real, very Russian feelings for Petra and would like their relationship to continue.

Except, he wouldn’t. On the high-school cliché docket in “Snake Pit” is the big dance, and while Viktor asks Petra to be his date, he’s really stringing her along as part of another wacky King’s Dominion tradition in which “rats”, aka the students not belonging to some kind of established crime family, are subjected to various unpleasant torments. Viktor is in league with Southern Belle bitch Brandy (Siobhan Williams), and Petra is forced to endure a very Carrie-esque public humiliation.

This isn’t as depressing as it sounds. Marcus and chums arrive in the nick of time with what is basically Scarecrow’s fear toxin and turn the tables, thus allowing Petra to see her true romantic future: Billy (Liam James). It’s all very touching – if a little mental.

The bonkers shenanigans persist throughout “Snake Pit”, which also introduces us to the higher authority of King’s Dominion and their on-trend hiring and firing policy, which, like the policy for everything else, involves murder. Guest star Henry Rollins wants to resign from his position in the Poisons Lab, and thus Lin (Benedict Wong) is reminded by upper management – a particularly creepy figure with an odd taste in furniture – of the penalty: Death.

But it turns out Lin is a bit more merciful than he lets on. He and Rollins fight, and he emerges victorious but allows him to live – a weirdly counterintuitive approach considering what he teaches his students. Is he just a big bag of wind? Is there more to this dynamic? Does he have some kind of beef with his creepy overseers? Questions!

“Snake Pit” also spared a bit of time for a couple of ongoing plot threads and character relationships: Namely, Marcus’s old bestiality-obsessed roommate from the boys’ home whom we briefly met in the previous episode, and a flourishing friendship between Saya (Lana Condor) and Maria (María Gabriela de Faría), who try and buy alcohol with fake ID, just to add another high-school cliché to the already substantial list. There’s a bit of a question mark hovering over this relationship that I’m sure will be dealt with in subsequent episodes, but for now it’s just nice to see Maria not have to be shackled to Chico (Michel Duval).

Regardless, “Snake Pit” was yet another enjoyable episode of Deadly Class, introducing some intriguing new worldbuilding details, developing its plot and characters, and delivering some welcome catharsis for the students who are clearly emerging as the “good guys”. For a show that thrives on its weird and occasionally shocking aesthetic and tone, it’s nice to see that there’s still value in letting teenage assassins be teenagers, even if it’s only for a bit.


You can check out our thoughts on the next episode by clicking these words.

View all