‘FBI’ Episode 15 – “Scorched Earth” | TV Recap

February 27, 2019
Jonathon Wilson 0
TV, TV Recaps
3

Summary

“Scorched Earth” sees Maggie and OA investigating a bombing plot in yet another quintessential episode of Dick Wolf’s FBI.

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3

Summary

“Scorched Earth” sees Maggie and OA investigating a bombing plot in yet another quintessential episode of Dick Wolf’s FBI.

This recap of FBI Episode 15, “Scorched Earth”, contains spoilers. You can check out our thoughts on the previous episode by clicking these words.


You know how it is – you wait all season for a bomb, and then loads go off at once. I kid, obviously; I’m pretty sure FBI has had plots involving bombs before, but the episodes are all so similar and of such a consistent quality that it’s hard to differentiate them. Weirdly, that isn’t even a criticism. It just is what it is, and FBI Episode 15, “Scorched Earth”, is another such episode. The show knows, perhaps better than any other, what it’s doing and who it’s doing it for.

The intriguing wrinkle in “Scorched Earth” is that it gives the often underused Dana (Sela Ward) someone to clash with, in the form of a Bureau-appointed profiler sent to help out on the case. Naturally, she sees this as having her toes stepped on, and while the rivalry only really serves to reinforce the ongoing idea that Dana is always right about everything because she’s the best, it’s nice to have some of the focus taken away from Maggie (Missy Peregrym) and OA (Zeeko Zaki).

Those two are still front and center, obviously, this time on the trail of a serial bomber who is targeting a big-money firm as revenge for its characteristically poor treatment of employees. FBI isn’t really the kind of show to make any major statements about big-business and capitalism and class stratification, but it works okay as subtext for a twisty, explosive whodunit, and that’s all it needs to be, really. As I’ve said before and will likely say again, FBI‘s episode plots are virtually infinite; they can be plucked from the headlines or social trends and scratch the surface just enough to be interesting without needed to risk anything by taking a strong stance or getting too hung-up on moralizing. It’s the quintessential procedural.

And “Scorched Earth”, really, was the quintessential FBI episode, once again impressing by being unimpressive; and weirdly, again, that isn’t a criticism.