Serious Men review – Hindi film is indicative of insecure parenting of today "Genius boy"

October 2, 2020
Daniel Hart 0
Film Reviews, Netflix
3.5

Summary

Despite the runtime, it’s worth the watch and it’s truly indicative of failed parenting of today.

3.5

Summary

Despite the runtime, it’s worth the watch and it’s truly indicative of failed parenting of today.

This review of Netflix film Serious Men contains no spoilers. The drama was released on Netflix on October 2, 2020


If there’s one thing we have witnessed since the crippling pandemic, it’s that our self-entitled generation has suffered dearly in the ‘new normal’. We are taught not to think for ourselves or work for our achievements — we just expect. And most of this comes from our misplaced, emotionally-driven parenting.

My biggest pet peeve is parents that live through their children’s lives vicariously because it can never be determined if the child’s achievements are spurred by their passion or a parent’s insecurity. A method I’m on board with is allowing children to grow up to be who they truly want to be.

And that’s why Serious Men resonated with me because it’s a resounding example of what happens when parents get too heavily involved in their children’s choices birthed from their own insecurity — if you are bringing up your child to impress other family members and parents, then you’ve already failed them.

The premise follows a father and a son. The father is tormented by his place in society, believing he needs to be appreciated and is dismantled by the pressure of what the world should be. When he learns that his son has newfound fame as a “boy-genius”, rather than allow his son to present to the world as himself, the father capitalizes on it.

It’s an uncomfortable watch for the most part; the young boy is innocent and friendly and seeing the father take advantage of a small brain brings a certain measure of dread to the film. Serious Men slowly builds up the problem and recognizes it on a level that we often do not see.

Serious Men delves into science and maths as the subplot — it also entwines politics and provides repercussions for getting the message wrong but the real crux of the story is how the father deals with the love while crushing someone he’s meant to care for.

Performances are impressive but the duration is overdone. The story is predicted once audiences reach halfway; Serious Men then lumbers through the second half trying to induce the emotional moments as much as possible.

Despite the runtime, it’s worth the watch and it’s truly indicative of failed parenting of today.


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