Over the Moon review – a surprisingly well made family adventure To the moon and back.

October 23, 2020
Daniel Hart 0
Film Reviews, Netflix
4

Summary

Understandably, Netflix does not release many animation features but Over the Moon has legs to be a routine rewatch for the family.

4

Summary

Understandably, Netflix does not release many animation features but Over the Moon has legs to be a routine rewatch for the family.

This review of Netflix film Over the Moon contains no spoilers. The family adventure film was released on October 23, 2020. 


Every time Netflix releases an original animation movie, I’m instantly suspicious. Maybe it’s the Disney propaganda that’s made me feel that no other platform can publish a worthwhile animation feature. Or maybe it’s because Netflix has such an intense schedule that undoubtedly they release bottom-of-the-barrel content to fill up their Fridays.

But to my surprise, Over the Moon managed to exceed all my low expectations and provided a worthwhile film. Maybe its quality is based on the fact that it has a limited cinema release as well. Admittedly, the Netflix film does desperately want to provide the same euphoria that Frozen ignited. At one stage of the film, it even provides an Olaf equivalent with the humourous naivety and lack of awareness born from limited life experience.

But Netflix’s Over the Moon hits certain beats that keep you engaged — the songs are enthralling and the characters are sweet and endearing. The story shines through a tragedy via the lead character — her mother is deceased and she’s battling with a family problem; her father has found a new woman who he is serious about. We can make many assumptions about what happens after that, but the adventure is spurred on by escapism. A child finding answers based on wanting to fly away from a problem that they do not want to confront.

That lead character is Fei Fei (voiced by Cathy Ang). Her imagination is spurred by stories regarding the moon told by her parents. She believes that on the moon, there’s a mythical goddess named Chang’e (voiced by Phillipa Soo). Fei Fei is desperate to meet Chang’e and the second half of the movie is a different experience entirely. It’s wonderfully colorful and the themes of family trauma and childhood escapism truly come to light.

Over the Moon keeps the audience engaged by keeping the emotional arc strong — rather than expanding the Universe to various, unanswerable subplots which often becomes the enemy of an animation fantasy, the Netflix film stays on the path to explain Fei Fei’s story. It’s not convoluted — in fact, it’s well-written. Its serious underlying tone means that children and their parents can watch this adventure without either party becoming bored.

Understandably, Netflix does not release many animation features but Over the Moon has legs to be a routine rewatch for the family.


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