Batman/Catwoman #1 review – bat cat flat

January 12, 2021
Louie Fecou 0
Comics
1

Summary

Batman/Catwoman #1 is all quite disjointed, and I suppose the idea is to introduce all the threads of the story in the issue, but for me, this is another Tom King series not worth following.

1

Summary

Batman/Catwoman #1 is all quite disjointed, and I suppose the idea is to introduce all the threads of the story in the issue, but for me, this is another Tom King series not worth following.

This review of Batman/Catwoman #1 is spoiler-free.


After Tom King left the regular Batman title, I must admit I was one of the people that felt it was time for him to go. His plodding, meandering through Gotham had become cliched, trite, and pretentious in a way that I had never experienced in a comic book run before. Slow pacing, and an inexplicable lean towards turning the title into a soap opera, and a bad soap opera at that, left me cold and uninterested in the characters — no mean feat when dealing with Batman.

The shark-jumping moment, breaking Alfred’s neck, was really the last straw for me. It achieved nothing in the narrative and was simply there to shock. Thank goodness that DC saw fit to replace Tom with James Tynion IV, who has managed to return the book to a superhero title.

However, under the Black Label umbrella, which proves Tom is a mature writer, DC has released the first issue of a 12-issue run entitled Batman/Catwoman.

Regular contributor Clay Mann is back on art chores, and Tom continues with his obsession over Catwoman and Batman’s navel-gazing relationship. The inside cover and first page is a two-page spread of a manor house, presented with “Bat and Cat” written across the top of the page. It looks like a weak spread for a cheap romance novel, and not the intro for a 12-issue Batman series.

As we get into the story, it’s not long before we get our first full page of Batman and Catwoman, posing against the night sky, and they are looking for the missing 14-year-old son of former flame Andrea Beaumont. If that name sounds familiar, I suggest watching Mask of the Phantasm.

The main “action” is interspersed with a subplot that seems to be an older Selina Kyle, somewhere in the future, paying a visit to an old friend in Seabird Island trailer park. The two strands will cross over with annoying frequency, as we follow Bruce and Selina into the lair of The Sewer King, before jumping to another cut scene with The Joker.

By the end of the book, we are treated to a couple of reveals that I won’t spoil here, that are designed to get the reader to return for further insights, but everything here is so generic, that you just can’t shake the feeling that we have seen this all before.

The art is all style over substance, with characters posed as if they know they are in a comic book.

The book has a card stock cover and a $4.99 cover price, for 22 pages of story, which is frankly too expensive for what is really just a run of the mill Batman book.

There is nothing in Batman/Catwoman #1 that is new, special, or deserving of the cover price; the twelve issues will cost you just under 60 bucks, and I know that King is writing for the trade here, but I will not be investing that amount of money in such an uninspired book.

The frustrating thing about this first issue is that Tom King seems to be only interested in pursuing his own style of writing, despite the fact that it has clearly failed on Batman. He seems to have learned nothing from his experience on Batman and has been given the opportunity to continue in a losing formula, in the hope of winning over fans that dropped out. However, Batman/Catwoman will do nothing except annoying Bat-fans that dropped off from his run in the first place, and I don’t think he will win any new ones with this book.

I suppose DC feels that any Bat book will sell, but it does make me wonder why this series was commissioned at all when there must be better ideas out there that could have been pushed. Batman/Catwoman #1 is all quite disjointed, and I suppose the idea is to introduce all the threads of the story in the issue, but for me, this is another Tom King series that I won’t be following.

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