Bridge and Tunnel season 1, episode 2 recap – “Making Up for Lost Time”

February 1, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Epix, Weekly TV
3.5

Summary

“Making Up for Lost Time” continues to entertain a couple of ill-advised relationships, with bigger, more dramatic turns waiting on the horizon, but will the show be able to retain its charms if it gets more serious?

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3.5

Summary

“Making Up for Lost Time” continues to entertain a couple of ill-advised relationships, with bigger, more dramatic turns waiting on the horizon, but will the show be able to retain its charms if it gets more serious?

This recap of Bridge and Tunnel season 1, episode 2, “Making Up for Lost Time”, contains spoilers.


With its half-hour runtime, laidback tone, and grounded, small-scale stakes, Bridge and Tunnel is one of the easiest shows on TV to just take in. It’s even easier to like. While there are problems – some unavoidable, related to the production – and a lack of narrative urgency that might be a deal-breaker for some, Bridge and Tunnel episode 2, “Making Up for Lost Time”, excels in much the same ways the premiere did, though being set a week later and with the legwork of introducing the core cast already done, it beds in the dynamics a little with a few intimate subplots.

Chief among them is, of course, Jimmy and Jill. In “The Graduates”, the two argued on an impromptu night out and it looked like their suddenly rekindled relationship was on the rocks once again. Jimmy has predictably been calling her all week, much to the amusement of his sister, Genie (Erica Hernandez), but hasn’t been able to get in touch. It’s only when his dad later reveals that she did call and he just forgot to tell Jimmy about it that they finally speak – and it goes about how you’d expect.

I must confess to getting a good laugh out of Jimmy sprinting at full tilt all the way to Jill’s house the second after she invites him around. They shower together and spend a day having sex and chatting, and we get that moment where one of the characters says the title of the show. As it turns out, Jill is beginning to resent her job in Manhattan because her snooty colleagues keep calling her “Bridge and Tunnel” to make fun of her thick accent.

Career-wise, Jimmy has more to lose, since his friends and family are rightly concerned that he’d happily give up his National Geographic opportunity to be with Jill, who clearly isn’t as into the idea of them being together as he is. This comes up once the very brief honeymoon period wears off and the two have to discuss what’s next. Jill is adamant that, once he leaves, it’s over – she wants her freedom. She’s still young, after all.

Naturally, Jimmy just interprets this as her wanting to have sex with other men, which in fairness she doesn’t deny. But she’s got a point. He’s going to be a long way away, for a long time, and after that, there’s every chance he’ll just end up somewhere else anyway. How can they make a relationship work under those conditions? Perhaps more importantly, why should they?

A silly argument later and they’re once again not making things work, but this isn’t even the most childish relationship in Bridge and Tunnel season 1, episode 2. Stacey and Mikey also spend the whole day in bed together, but unlike Jimmy, he’s quite happy with a casual fling. Stacey, though, isn’t – at least not in the same way. She doesn’t want anything serious with Mikey, but she wants him to want something serious with her. She wants to be a little possessive over him despite continually reminding him of her relationship with another man, and she’s clearly a bit bent out of shape that he isn’t letting her have her cake and eat it too. It hardly makes Stacey likable, but it’s a myth that interesting characters need to be. Besides, we all know a Stacey, don’t we?

On that note, we all know a Pags, too. Most of the comedy in “Making Up for Lost Time” comes from him since his mother is beginning to date Stacey’s dad, Mr. Ross, an absurd Long Island caricature car salesman. He’s the odd man out in the sense he’s not traditionally ripped and handsome like his friends and doesn’t have a fling to occupy all his attention. Instead, he’s forced to deal with his mother’s fling, which he’d rather not hear another word about. Mr. Ross’s familiarity with Pags makes this whole subplot a lot funnier – I’m looking forward to seeing more of their interactions in subsequent episodes.

But Bridge and Tunnel Episode 2 does lead to a dramatic payoff since it ends with Jimmy quite obviously contemplating not going to Alaska. I’m not sure if the show will be able to retain its charms if it gets more serious, but we’ll have to wait and see.

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