The Walking Dead season 10, episode 19 recap – “One More” the hangover

March 12, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Weekly TV
3.5

Summary

“One More” sees a bonding session between Gabriel and Aaron get very dark, very quickly in a tense chapter.

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3.5

Summary

“One More” sees a bonding session between Gabriel and Aaron get very dark, very quickly in a tense chapter.

This recap of The Walking Dead season 10, episode 19, “One More”, contains spoilers.


“One More” is the kind of episode that could only exist in this extended season, with time and space to splurge on a buddy adventure between two underused characters in Father Gabriel and Aaron. The hook is a bit of a lighthearted excursion, the chance for some gags and some male bonding, and we certainly get that… then we get uncomfortably dark.

It’s clever how this episode subverts expectations. It begins with Gabriel and Aaron following a map given to them by Maggie, trying to scare up supplies. But the adventure proves fruitless, for the most part, and Aaron is ready for home. Gabriel, though, is determined to just hit “One More” spot, convinced it’ll be the one that yields a precious bounty. Even after an encounter with Walkers leaves the map ruined, he reckons he can reach the final spot from memory. It seems like too much of a leap of faith, though, and they agree to return home to Alexandria, but on the way they run into an abandoned warehouse that wasn’t on the map but just might hold the supplies they’re looking for – among other things.

Those other things include a wild boar and a bottle of expensive whiskey. They enjoy both of those together, play poker, and have a nice chat about faith and ministering, both a little wavy. When Gabriel wakes up, Aaron is missing. And he soon finds out why when he’s held at the end of an AK-47 by a man with a heavily scarred face who feels his hideout has been violated.

The penance for this intrusion in The Walking Dead season 10, episode 18 is a game of Russian roulette. See, this guy has a point to prove about the inherent savagery of man, and how the only people left these days are murderers and thieves – as Gabriel put it the night before, evil people are the rule, not the exception. With a revolver loaded with a single bullet between them, each man must choose to pull the trigger with the gun pointed at his own head or his compatriot’s.

The man, whose name we later learn is Mays (a guest-starring Robert Patrick), is trying to prove a point. He thinks one or the other will kill their friend rather than themselves, but Gabriel and Aaron only point the revolver at their own heads. What’s more is that they continuously minister to Mays throughout, trying to change his point of view by extolling the virtues of Alexandria and its people.

Mays takes the opportunity to share his own backstory, about how his own brother ate the last of his food and tried to kill him, forcing him to off not only his own sibling but his family. Since then he has believed that the essential nature of all men is that selfishness, that willingness to do whatever it takes in order to survive. He seems too far gone to be talked around, but Gabriel and Aaron don’t quit their routine. Eventually, mostly through their willingness to sacrifice themselves rather than turn on each other, they’re able to make him see the error of his ways, to challenge his belief that there are no good people remaining. Then Gabriel stoves his head in with Aaron’s detached Morningstar arm.

It’s a cynical, brutal action, and Aaron takes issue with it – it also largely proves Mays’ point. But The Walking Dead season 10, episode 18 lets Gabriel off the hook a little when he and Aaron find Mays’ hiding spot in the warehouse roof, and discover that he has been holding his brother captive all this time, forcing him to gawp at the dead, rotting bodies of his family. When Gabriel releases the man, he steals his gun and kills himself. There’s no wonder, really.

After leaving the warehouse probably closer than ever, Gabriel and Aaron spot the water tower that they discussed earlier as being a marker for the final spot on the map. “One more,” indeed.

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