The Great North season 1, episode 7 recap – “Period Piece Adventure”

March 30, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Weekly TV
3.5

Summary

“Period Piece Adventure” splits its time between a mystery and a protest, to amusing results.

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3.5

Summary

“Period Piece Adventure” splits its time between a mystery and a protest, to amusing results.

This recap of The Great North season 1, episode 7, “Period Piece Adventure”, contains spoilers.


As ever, “Period Piece Adventure” is divided into two distinct A and B plots. One is much better than the other, in this case. The former, which involves Beef being portrayed in the local paper as the thief of a garden gnome thanks to a tell-tale bootprint left at the scene of the crime, builds to what is, really, a solid joke about the long memories of Lone Moose citizens given how little goes on there thanks to its remoteness. But Judy’s efforts in an art project that turns into a protest against corporatism in support of women’s rights is good value.

The Beef thing stems back to a grudge held for thirty years, a local junkyard owner (Mindy Sterling), and a pair of boots that Beef couldn’t bring himself to return. The subplot largely puts Honeybee front and centre, which is nice, and Sean Clements’ John Johnson is a fun pastiche of a newspaperman. But it’s a light subplot.

What Judy’s up to is where The Great North season 1, episode 7 shines, as mentioned. With a school art project her big opportunity to make her mark as an artist, she enlists Alyson for help, whose beret proves she means business. But all Judy’s ideas are quickly thrown out in favor of a protest mural, battling against the injustice of dated feminine hygiene products in the school bathrooms. It’s a worthy cause, but Judy wants the glory — at least until the school’s superintendent, Sandy Flarts, shuts the project down and Judy realizes that she’s the heiress of the company responsible for the belted sanitary towels. This can’t stand!

The kids, having been told they can’t paint the mural, instead decide to be it. Do their efforts amount to legitimate social change? Well, kind of. As it turns out, the school needs the money it saves on those products; it was, ironically, the pot that funded Judy’s art supplies. But the principal is willing to spring for a box of tampons in the girls’ bathroom when he realizes how cheap they are. Maybe he should have asked that in the first place.

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