Fatma season 1, episode 4 recap – “Mothers and Sons”

April 27, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Netflix, TV Recaps
3

Summary

“Mothers and Sons” delivers some decent revelations, but is it too little too late?

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3

Summary

“Mothers and Sons” delivers some decent revelations, but is it too little too late?


This recap of Fatma season 1, episode 4, “Mothers and Sons”, contains spoilers.


I can only speak for myself, but I feel like if I’d just violently murdered someone, I wouldn’t spend the night at the scene. This, though, is the kind of nonsensical decision-making that has characterized Fatma thus far, and “Mothers and Sons” makes clear from the jump that it’s going to continue. After spending the night with Ekber’s corpse, Fatma finally flees before the new working day begins, hiding out in the back of Yusuf’s truck as he calls Bayram to let him know the target is dead.

It doesn’t come as much of a surprise in Fatma episode 4 when Fatma, expert assassin, starts guzzling down bottles of water she hasn’t paid for in a gas station. When Yusuf confronts her, she ends up sticking up for him to prevent the police from making off with him, I suppose because she’s got a lot to think about, both in the present day and in flashbacks to Oguz being kicked out of school and then later hit and killed by a car. Fatma blames herself since she was focusing on a call from Zafer and not the Green Cross Code, which is understandable if a little overly familiar as far as such things go.

Next on the unsurprising revelations agenda in Fatma season 1, episode 4 is that Yusuf was the one who Zafer went to jail to protect. Fatma shooting Sevket has naturally thrown matters into complete disarray, but “Mothers and Sons” isn’t finished with the revelations quite yet. After a pursuit and some gunshots, Yusuf eventually admits that Zafer is alive and well in his hometown. Fatma, perhaps understandably, has designs on making him pay for his betrayal. She also shoots Yusuf, perhaps adding another body to the pile, but she walks away without finishing him off.

The revelation about Zafer obviously spices things up a bit, but is it too little too late? As far as the guilt and grief over childhood abuse and the loss of a kid in an accident that may or may not have been her fault, Fatma’s backstory feels like it’s assembled from a traumatic history starter pack, and it’s difficult to invest in for that reason. This is to say nothing of the obvious liberties that the show is taking with logical consistency, which will doubtlessly – and rightly – be a dealbreaker for many.

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