Love, Death & Robots season 2 review – a walk on the wild side

May 14, 2021
M.N. Miller 0
Netflix, TV Reviews
4

Summary

Love, Death & Robots season 2 is not a Black Mirror or Twilight Zone, but a walk on the wild side of a sci-fi anthology series.

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4

Summary

Love, Death & Robots season 2 is not a Black Mirror or Twilight Zone, but a walk on the wild side of a sci-fi anthology series.

This review of Netflix’s Love, Death & Robots season 2 does not contain spoilers — the series was released on the streaming service on May 14, 2021. 

Read the recap of the first chapter.

Filled with crazy characters, absurd scenarios, and genre-bending storytelling, Tim Miller and David Fincher’s Love, Death & Robots smartly slices the season (and episodes, really) in half to sacrifice quantity but not quality.

The episodes are an eclectic set but are all connected thematically in some way, Whether it comes to humankind’s dependence on technology, arrogance when it comes to respecting their environment, how corporate greed influences a suggestive society, or humanity’s lack of respect for human life, it can all be summed up as humankind’s hubris that will eventually be our downfall.

The second season is filled with stunning visuals in installments such as “Ice”, “Life Hutch”, and “Pod Squad” while also showing a real eye for juxtaposition in “The Drowned Giant” and “Automated Customer Service”. The entire series is a visual marvel along with ambitious storylines and themes that push the envelope, With the exception of “The Tall Grass”, which comes across as a body-cleansing straight horror episode, which was welcomed.

The show did come under some criticism for its portrayal of women. Most during the first season became victims and suffered trauma. This time around there are fewer female characters, and the one featured is killed at the hands of men. Most of the time, except in “Snow in the Desert” where a female becomes the hero, the explanation takes away from the very point the episode was trying to make. The comedy in-season ones take more of a backstory and are used more as a relief.

However, you can’t take away Robot‘s tenacity for staying the course of uncompromised storylines of contemptuous characters, along with robots that loath them and their pets that tolerate them.

Netflix’s Love, Death & Robots season 2 is not a Black Mirror or Twilight Zone, but a walk on the wild side of a sci-fi anthology series that’s an amalgamation of science fiction, horror, action, and dark comedy. In other words, it rocks. Eat your heart out, Nelson Algren.

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