The Woman in the Window ending explained – Is there a psycho in the rear window? Some hitch and some c**k.

May 14, 2021
M.N. Miller 0
Ending Explained, Film, Netflix

This article discusses the ending of the Netflix film The Woman in the Window, so it will contain major spoilers.

In my review of The Woman in the Window, I noted that it is a thriller for the casual film fan, not the cinephile. It works, just not as well as it should. Nevertheless, it has a star-studded cast, and Wright’s steady hand builds enough tension to earn this murder mystery a (very) mild recommendation.

Netflix’s The Woman in the Window ending explained

Amy Adams’ Dr. Anna Fox is an agoraphobic. She spends most of her time watching a happyish lady (Julianne Moore), a teenager (Fred Hechinger), a couple named the Russels who need a serious vacation or prescribed medications (Gary Oldman and Jennifer Jason Leigh), and violating her tenant’s (played by Wyatt Russell) boundaries. She casts her eye on the naked city one too many times and watches Moore’s character, Jane, die of a stab wound.

When she calls the police, they, of course, don’t believe her. The maternal Russell claims she is Jane and has never talked to Foxy. The paternal Russell (Oldman) chooses to smack his son around like it’s an underutilized parenting style. They are an intimidating pair, but that doesn’t stop the good Doc from trying to find Jane and help Russell’s son from abuse.

Hold on. It turns out that it was Russell’s teenage son all along. He has psychotic tendencies, most likely brought on by the trauma of being abused by the Russells and the abandonment of his biological mother (Moore). So, he comes for Dr. Fox next. She escapes to the rooftop garden. For her troubles, she gets what amounts to a hole punch to the face by being impaled with a stainless steel hand tiller by young Ethan. She fights off the Norman Bates wannabee, and she pushes him through the skylight to his death.

What happens next?

A secondary subplot of the film is that Dr. Fox won’t leave her house because her child was killed in a car accident that was her fault. This was most likely the reason for her drive to save Ethan and the fake Jane from the Russell’s.

Now, life and her face are patched up, she reaches a sense of closure. She may have come to the realization she cannot control things that are not in her control. You can’t change faith, as trouble found her in her residence anyway. So she walks out of her home, down the street, enjoying this fresh air, the hint of sun on a cool fall day, and takes one step at a time in a life where you can only take a day at a time.

What do you think of the ending of the Netflix film The Woman in the Window? Comment below with your interpretations and opinions.

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