Superman and Lois season 1, episode 6 recap – “Broken Trust”

May 19, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Weekly TV
4

Summary

“Broken Trust” reminds everyone that, despite a hiatus, Superman and Lois is a very good show.

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4

Summary

“Broken Trust” reminds everyone that, despite a hiatus, Superman and Lois is a very good show.


This recap of Superman and Lois season 1, episode 6, “Broken Trust”, contains spoilers.


Superman and Lois has been off the air for so long that it’s easy to forget how good it is, but the sixth episode, “Broken Trust”, is a solid reminder. It continues on directly from the previous episode, with new Speedster Tag Harris nursing a vendetta against Jordan Kent specifically, but it feels like it has turned a corner in the development of the latter, as well as found a real rhythm in its overarching plot involving Morgan Edge and alt-universe Lex Luthor. It’s a lot, but fittingly for a show about the Man of Steel, it can shoulder the burden.

To be fair, though, Superman and Lois episode 6 asks Jordan to carry a lot of its dramatic weight, and he isn’t as adjusted to the responsibility as his father. The episode’s cliff-hanger suggestion that he’s dangerously comatose probably won’t amount to much – although it’d be pretty ballsy to kill off one of the main characters – but it’s nevertheless a neat encapsulation of Jordan’s “puberty but with superpowers” arc. That examination of male teen angst has always been the thematic backbone of the series, and “Broken Trust” is the best example of it yet.

It’s neat how the episode is able to tangle this up in the in-universe politics of Smallville. A big football game against Metropolis both literally and figuratively allows Jordan to confront his past and the rage he’s nursing against his lifelong bullies. The difference now, though, is that he has the powers to turn the tables; does he, though, have the maturity to wield those powers? Spoiler alert, but the answer is no, he doesn’t.

That’s good, though. Following his encounter with Tag, Jordan shouldn’t be playing football anyway, but he’s determined to do so just to have that opportunity to stand up for himself. It’s misguided, obviously, and Clark knows it, but he also knows how important this is to his son after having lived through a version of it himself. The most powerful and interesting moment of Superman and Lois episode 6 occurs when Jordan becomes so emotionally overwhelmed during the game that he must slyly vent his heat vision into Clark’s hands. It’s one of my favorite low-key Superman sequences perhaps ever, and a perfect metaphor for the responsibilities – nay, burdens – of superheroism.

Elsewhere in “Broken Trust”, Lois takes matters into her own hands regarding Morgan Edge by sneaking into his mines with the help of the suspiciously resourceful “Marcus Bridgewater”, whose ruse she sees through almost immediately. Knowing something is up, though not exactly what, she turns to Lana and Kyle for their help in bringing down Edge, though they’re reluctant since, at least to their mind, he’s helping out the people of Smallville by providing them employment opportunities and enriching their economy. This all shows how suffering small towns are vulnerable to the machinations of people like Edge, which is pleasingly down-to-Earth for an episode that also has Superman beam heat vision at a runaway train and builds to a standoff in which he tries to stop the U.S. Military from butchering a schoolkid with superpowers.

In that standoff, which occurs towards the end of Superman and Lois season 1, episode 6, there’s a lovely moment of mirroring as Clark, like Jordan, fights to keep his own powers in check when he’s shot with Kryptonite rounds designed for the express purpose of killing him when all he’s trying to do is help. It’s clear he could wipe out everyone bothering him in the same way that Jordan could have cooked the entire football field if his father wasn’t there to help him, but the show is pushing the idea that part of being a superhero is recognizing how your powers are perceived by others. Clark recognizes that an unnecessary abuse of his power would forever sour the public’s opinion against Superman, and those like him – by extension, his own son. Clark’s lack of support in grappling with this brings Jordan’s predicament into sharper focus and allows Clark himself, but also Jonathan, who sacrifices his arm to stop Jordan from going too far, to become richer characters in how they respond to it.

This is a very good show, and not enough people are talking about it.

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