Mortel season 2 review – a way better second instalment

July 2, 2021
Daniel Hart 0
Netflix, TV Reviews
3.5

Summary

It no longer feels like a mish-mash of plot points, but instead has an ulterior objective that the audience can get behind.

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3.5

Summary

It no longer feels like a mish-mash of plot points, but instead has an ulterior objective that the audience can get behind.

This review of Netflix’s Mortel season 2 does not contain spoilers.

I was critical of the first season of Mortel. There was a feeling that the characters did not work, thrown against a teen backdrop and a school setting, mixed amongst god mythology and demonic tendencies. It felt off. It was marked that the characters, especially Sofiana, were not interesting enough — season 1 relied way too much on the “moody teen” trope that we have all become accustomed to.

But that’s not to say the story does not have promise. Mortel left audiences with a measure of potential to make season 2 worthwhile. Despite the Turkish series making a comeback two years later (we suspect Covid-19 had a hand in this), the story returns with ease, and it feels way more established and formed.

It helps that the stakes are higher, and the writers have stopped teasing with the routine of school. This time there’s an earnest attempt to understand the powers that are wielded and to bring down Obé (the announced god) once and for all. Season 2 feels sensible, and there’s a presumed logic behind it.

It’s not uncommon for a complex story to shine brighter in its second season. Netflix has DARK in its inventory after all. It helps that Mortel season 2 has Sofiane’s brother (Reda), who surprisingly came back to life in the season 1 finale. It adds a layer to the story, as Luisa’s world feels prominent — her grandmother and the Désandans are destined to protect the world against Obé, meaning there’s a level of importance to what Reda represents.

Coupled with increased stakes, the main trio (Sofiane, Victor, and Luisa) have a renewed sense of unity in season 2 that resonates with the audience. Their friendship group was so deliberately fractured in the last season, that a thematic view of friendship and togetherness warms nicely in an otherwise dark story.

The fact is, Mortel decided to make the audience care about the mythology that runs through the story’s veins. It no longer feels like a mish-mash of plot points, but instead has an ulterior objective that the audience can get behind. This is by no means “series of the year” but it’s a “grab and watch” on Netflix, especially at only 6 chapters long.

What did you think of Netflix’s Mortel season 2? Comment below. 

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