Bankrolled (Fondeados) review – in need of an update

July 24, 2021
M.N. Miller 0
Film Reviews, Netflix
2.5

Summary

Bankrolled is a comedy about the invention of a social justice app but requires an update.

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2.5

Summary

Bankrolled is a comedy about the invention of a social justice app but requires an update.

This review of the Netflix film Bankrolled does not contain spoilers.

Why must all slacker films use Millenials as the vehicle to paint a picture of a generation’s ambiguity? The stoner, slacker, lazy, unambitious, and always wanted everything handed to them generation that must be Millenials? Generation X and Z aren’t good enough for that type of picture? Hell, half of the latter generation chose to live with their parents instead of going out independently (lazy bastards). For Christ’s sake, identity theft was classified as an actual thing in 1964 (thanks a lot Gen-X). That’s the inspiration for Marcos Bucay’s Netflix comedy Bankrolled. It’s a movie that had the potential to be an edgy comedy but was in desperate need of an update.

Here we are again analyzing the stereotypical group. An utterly directionless pair, Blas Solano (Ricardo Polanco) and Polo Rios Aldo Escalante), thirty-year-old roommates, are stuck in a rut. There are wasting away in the big city. That’s until they come up with an app that makes them millions. The only problem is they haven’t come up with it yet. It’s like getting a check written from Mark Cuban on Sharktank for an idea without a blueprint or plan in place.

After a night under the influence of some psychedelic drugs to deal with their depressed predicament, they started a GoFundMe account. Their idea is for an app called Sign Now. A social justice initiative app. They wake up with a brinks truck full of money in their crowd-funding account. So, this is basically your plot from Office Space when they forget to move over the decimal.

Bucay’s film’s best moments are the nonsensical ones. Bucay penned the film’s script. It’s designed to generate laughs by rubbing the conflicting personalities of Escalante and Polanco’s characters. One wants to make money and sit back, chilling with his favorite espresso. The other wants to be a titan of the corporate industrial world. It’s not as successful as one would think, considering how talented these performers can be. What does work is the delightful Natalia Tellez (Ninis)? She is a breath of fresh air that the film needed more of.

Bankrolled had a better idea for a comedy than execution. It would help if you had an irreverent take in this day and age. Taking an idea of fraud to a social justice initiative app is an idea for a story that edgy great comedies are made of. Unfortunately, the film’s third act (and once again the post-credit scene to build in a sequel) plays it too safe. We are left to wonder what could have been.

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