Mr. Corman season 1, episode 6 recap – “Funeral”

September 3, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
Apple TV+, Weekly TV
4

Summary

“Funeral” is a morose chapter that delves deeper into Josh’s backstory as he’s confronted with the pain of loss and regret.

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4

Summary

“Funeral” is a morose chapter that delves deeper into Josh’s backstory as he’s confronted with the pain of loss and regret.

This recap of Mr. Corman season 1, episode 6, “Funeral”, contains spoilers.


While there hasn’t been much explicit continuation in previous episodes of Mr. Corman, “Funeral” benefits from picking up exactly where last week’s installment left off. Josh’s influencer friend, Dax, died from bumping his head during a pointless fight in a nightclub parking lot. Josh doesn’t blame himself for that, but he finds it difficult to shoulder the burden of keeping up Dax’s freewheeling facade when his mother asks if he enjoyed his last night alive. He didn’t, really. Most of his life was a lie and he died never having become the person he pretended to be. Looking around, Josh is probably wondering how many people might attend his own funeral, might ask the same sort of questions, might know that deep down he never followed his own dreams and made anything of himself, either.

Mr. Corman season 1, episode 6 recap

There are moments of bleak comedy in “Funeral”, such as Dax’s dad asking Josh if his son was able to get some decent punches in during the fight that killed him. There are other little snippets of physical comedy and social faux pas later that’ll prompt a chuckle, if only because the rest of the runtime is so unrelentingly bleak. During the funeral, Victor, who is otherwise unseen, messages Josh to ask if he’s okay — to say he isn’t is an understatement. Running into his old musician girlfriend, Megan (Juno Temple), seems to make matters better for a while, and then only makes them worse.

Josh is haunted, in his way — the ghost of a musician lives inside him. “Funeral” ambles through all the stages of a strained meeting with an old friend, old lover; the polite small talk, the polite goodbyes, the indecision. Josh has to wait a while for his flight home, so it only makes sense to accompany Megan while she shops for her mother, whose lonely, cat-loving existence Megan is brought to tears over in a supermarket. As she wails, Josh looks helplessly on. A nosy woman intervenes and asks Megan if Josh is bothering her, and she says he is. Her hysterical laughter at this joke seems like a cry for help or at least a way to drown out reality. Megan doesn’t have much more to laugh about than Josh does, really. She has released an album — Josh imagines a meteor crashing to Earth when she asks him about his own music — but there doesn’t seem to be any surety around her career. Her mother, whom we meet shortly afterward, isn’t even entirely sure it exists.

Eventually, the shared history between Josh and Megan becomes too much for either of them to handle, helped along by Cheryl (Lucy Lawless), Megan’s mother, who is so excited to see Josh she forgets how much time has passed since the last time she did. She openly asks them why they couldn’t have worked it out. She plays one of their old band’s songs. Megan eventually flees for her childhood bedroom and hides there, hugging her knees like a kid, while Cheryl gets drunk and vomits homemade fruit dip all over herself in an odd moment that it’s difficult to know how we’re supposed to take. Josh cleans it up. If only his own messes were so easily addressed.

In the final scene of “Funeral”, Josh sits beside Megan in her bedroom. He attempts to comfort her, at first by kissing her, which she rejects, and then by asking her why she left him, which only opens the floodgates for more painful memories. She thinks he gave up everything they built together. He thinks he abandoned a childish dream for reality; he became an adult, without realizing that the implication is that she stayed a child. He was sure he was right then, and remains so now, even as Megan tries to tearfully articulate how small his lack of support and belief made her feel. Even when she lays out that he never believed she could make it, his only response is that he didn’t — probably still doesn’t — believe anyone could. If that isn’t his personality, in a nutshell, I don’t know what is.

You can stream Mr. Corman exclusively on Apple TV+.

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