VOIR review – a short docuseries which fails to take off

December 7, 2021
Jordan Russell Lyon 0
Netflix, Streaming Service, TV Reviews
2

Summary

The selling point is that David Fincher produces the docuseries. While the show has facts here and there, the result isn’t quite as great as you would expect. More misses than hits; only two episodes hit the mark in VOIR.

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2

Summary

The selling point is that David Fincher produces the docuseries. While the show has facts here and there, the result isn’t quite as great as you would expect. More misses than hits; only two episodes hit the mark in VOIR.

Netflix docuseries VOIR was released on the streaming service on December 7, 2021.

VOIR is an American series that contain visual essays with a different selection of films getting the focus in each episode. In total, there are six episodes: “Summer of the Shark”, “The Ethics of Revenge”, “But I Don’t Like Him”, “The Duality of Appeal”, “Film vs Television”, and “Profane and Profound”, all around 20 minutes in length.

In terms of audience, VOIR could possibly be best suited to those only just beginning to look into the theory of filmmaking, i.e. students. Anyone who already has a fair share of film knowledge stored in their brain may find this series redundant. As for VOIR as a whole, is it any good? Meh. To sum it up quickly, it doesn’t appear as good as it should have done.

Firstly, the narrations for each of the episodes sound dull. The docuseries could benefit from more life. Currently, it sounds very much like a half a**ed teacher speaking to their disinterested class. Aside from that, what may put the audience off from watching the entire series is the first episode. “Summer of the Shark” doesn’t exactly excite you enough to warrant a binge-watch of the five remaining episodes, no matter how short they are. Instead, the first episode spreads the familiar story of how people were too scared to be near water following the release of Jaws. But upon hearing this spread out for nearly 20 minutes, it’s not a great watch. If you’re watching the episode with memories of when Jaws got released to the cinema, maybe it will be more enjoyable.

On the other hand, the second episode, “The Ethics of Revenge”, is more enjoyable. Unlike episode 1, “The Ethics of Revenge” focuses on the theme of revenge, which naturally brings a selection of films into the episode. Highlights include The Princess Bride, Carrie, and Thelma and Louise. Also, unlike “Summer of the Shark”, the second episode has more information for the audience to learn. Whilst it may not provide anything groundbreaking, it’s still more insightful than the previous episode. The remaining episodes don’t live up to the standard of “The Ethics of Revenge”, that is, at least, until the series comes to its final episode, “Profane and Profound”. With a focus on Eddie Murphy’s debut film, 48 Hours, the episode provides a visual essay on the focus on racism. With its final episode, VOIR may have possibly achieved what it has set out to do.

One of the biggest strengths of the series is the episode intros. They’re the kind of intros that you’ll watch again and again. Whilst David Fincher is the producer, and that very fact is sure to entice viewers, if you were to take his name away, VOIR would match the educational factor of some self-made productions on YouTube.

VOIR provides a nostalgic trip for movies of past years. But, otherwise, the docuseries does not add much to what audiences already know.

What did you think about the Netflix docuseries Voir? Comment below.

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