Tag Archives: October

Review – You’re Next

This review is part of our 31 Days of Horror series. You can check out the other posts by clicking these words.

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Review – Don’t Sleep

Director: Rick Bieber

Writer: Rick Bieber

Rating: 15

Release Date: 29 September, 2017

Full Cast & Crew Info

This review is part of our 31 Days of Horror series. You can check out the other posts by clicking these words.

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Review – Friday the 13th (2009)

This review is part of our 31 Days of Horror series. You can check out the other posts by clicking these words.

Today is Friday the 13th of October – I know this because when I was opening the kitchen blinds this morning, one of the fittings fell out of the wall, thus collapsing them onto my head along with a chunk of plaster roughly the size of a tennis ball. I don’t believe that this particular day of the calendar is cursed, obviously, as I’m a grown man, but I do believe in relentless, uncompromising bad luck, and if the Friday the 13th films have ever been about anything, they’ve been about that: Jason Voorhees, world’s unluckiest man.

Since the 1980 original, there have been another, what, ten of these things? And throughout them Jason has been drowned multiple times, sliced, clubbed, stabbed, cleaved, incinerated, struck by lightning (I think more than once), melted, shot, experimented on, cryogenically frozen, thawed, jettisoned into space and, as far as I can tell, has never gotten laid. There’s no wonder he’s irritated. Wouldn’t you be? The life of an outdoorsman is obviously fraught with peril.

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Review – The Hills Have Eyes

This review is part of our 31 Days of Horror series. You can check out the other posts by clicking these words.

The Carters are a typical American family travelling throughout the southwest. However, their trip takes a detour off the beaten path across the desert. They suffer a blow-out with their tyres and plough into a rock – an event that leaves them stranded in an area closed off from the rest of civilisation. The area was formerly used by the US government as a nuclear test site. It was thought to be empty – but they were wrong. The Carters gradually realise they may have fallen into a trap perpetrated by the disgruntled residents of the area, who are intent on carrying out a gruesome massacre.

I thought I was being brave when I set out to watch The Hills Have Eyes the other night, however it could be said I was actually being rather stupid. How naïve of me to think that it would be a terrific film based on the four-star rating the TV magazine had awarded it. I was mildly grossed out by the film, but was more disappointed than anything else.

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Review – Cult of Chucky

What, they’re still making these?

*Checks Wikipedia*

Oh, shit, this the seventh of these things – the latest instalment in the 29-year-old Child’s Play franchise, once again written and directed by Don Mancini, who by now has steered this bizarre string of films through so many genres and pop-culture trends that I honestly couldn’t say, before watching this one, what I was in for. Now, after having watched it, I still can’t say for certain exactly what it was. These films have been, at various points, generic slashers, satirical comedies, and psychological thrillers. Cult of Chucky is all of those things, and also some others. It’s a weird and violent little film which, depending on how it performs, is either going to be a swansong or a fresh start for horror’s most tenacious, indestructible franchise.

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Review – The Babadook

This review is part of our 31 Days of Horror series. You can check out the other posts by clicking these words.

What is surprising, poignant, provocative, and frightening about The Babadook is its honesty. Here is a film – a debut feature, no less, written and directed by Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent – that repurposes the innate ridiculousness of the horror genre as a tool of philosophical self-examination. In it, the characters imagine their fears, their hates, and their inner psychoses as a folkloric bogeyman; as a convenient, literal manifestation of their most shameful anxieties. Here, as in most horror films, things go bump in the night, but what lurks in its small, lightless spaces is terrifying because it is bold and true. Whether its titular ghoul is real or imagined ceases to be the point long before the end of The Babadook, but the fear that it represents remains; it is our collective fear, of our own malice and frustration and distress and agony, even – perhaps especially – when we direct it towards those we’re supposed to love. The film asks us to come to terms with the ugly sides of ourselves.

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