‘Wolf’ (‘Börü’) | Netflix Original Series Review Time to hunt.

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Summary

Netflix original series Wolf serves a weak script in its six chapters, but it is propped up by an action-led plot.

I am confident that the international series’ are overtaking English and American releases on Netflix. This observation is hardly a negative; the streaming platform is doing a thorough job of releasing binge-worthy stories for the masses, and if you can pick between dubbed or subtitled then you have your weekend sorted. When I read the premise for Netflix original series Wolf, otherwise known as Börü, I was prepared for the ride; a story about a Turkish special operation unit that tackles the growing threat of terrorism in the country.

Unfortunately, I felt to a large extent let down by the Turkish series. Unlike the dark, shadowy world of Dogs of Berlin, Wolf lacks general substance. The opening episode opens up with narration explaining how sometimes monsters win, and I purposefully shackled myself to the sofa ready to be left breathless by some established plot involving terrorism.

Wolf concentrates exceptionally well on the action; giving obstacles and camera angles true to a video-game as the special ops team Börü have to overcome plenty of gunfire. Each episode is a different terrorist scenario, but in the first chapter, where the special ops team are dealing with a school hostage scenario, you fully understand what type of ride you are on. Wolf prides itself on its gunfights, its masculinity and the environment of war, but when it comes to the story and the characters, the Netflix series fails in its writing, which is extremely poor.

That’s not to say Alper Caglar‘s series is not worth the “Add to My List” option, because if you are ready to be immersed in good action sets, well played-out missions and the odd cheesy line, then Wolf should appease the masses. Its grittiness, excitement, and scene-setting provide enough entertainment to get through each hour-and-20-minute episode. As far as Netflix goes, Wolf lacks that temptation to binge – you could watch one episode and then leave the rest for a rainy day.

As a final point, I did decide to experiment with the dubbed and subtitled versions of the show to see if the dialogue was a different experience, but unfortunately, it’s just a weak script, giving insulting exposition, but propped up by a decent budget providing easy-on-the-eye theatrics. Wolf is at least worth a try.

Daniel Hart

Daniel Hart is the Co-Founder of Ready Steady Cut and has operated as Editor-in-Chief since 2017.

6 thoughts on “‘Wolf’ (‘Börü’) | Netflix Original Series Review

  • December 24, 2018 at 5:04 am
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    The movie is full of insiders about recent incidents. Every character, every name and action has a meaning to it. The characters are supposed to represent Turkish commanders and such who where falsely accused of crimes (Balyoz,Ergenekon) and had to waste a part of their life, even die in prison for basically nothing. There are so many small details in the movie, Alper Caglar is a genius. If you don’t follow Turkish news, military etc. you will not understand the message behind every character and incident, so please do not ever go ahead and comment on something you don’t understand again. It’s not your fault that you don’t understand the message behind everything but don’t feel free to criticize the characters and story without research.

    Reply
  • December 28, 2018 at 8:55 pm
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    I agree with the above comment by Han.

    The mini series is based on actual events and most characters represent real-life persons. I understand how it could be difficult for foreigners to understand the storyline and characters behind it. That’s why you should’ve done your homework before criticizing the storyline/characters and stating that it is “extremely poorly written.” Plus, this is not an original Netflix series – the series were released back in February 2018 in Turkey. Netflix just recently bought the copyrights to the show.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 4:38 pm
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    So your take on the series is “The script is weak for reasons I won’t bother to explain but the series looks nice”. This is your whole review.

    Did the whole part about the members being honest to each other and sharing their personal issues and stories just fly over your head entirely? What “masculinity” are you talking about? Did you just turn off your brain during the personal conversations and then turn it back on during the properly coordinated gunfights (“video game”, really?)

    What about the whole historical dimension and political infighting within the Turkish government which results in the army and police being betrayed by their own leaders? And the values and behavior emphasized by the characters as a reflection of Turkish culture? The intimacy in the language (honorifics like “brother” and “sister”, the way characters respond to seniority, and so on).

    You don’t even bother to explain your expectations in your writeup or your criteria for reviewing the film and you already make a recommendation?

    Give me a break.

    Reply
  • January 3, 2019 at 4:40 pm
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    So your take on the series is “The script is weak for reasons I won’t bother to explain but the series looks nice”. This is your whole review.

    Did the whole part about the members being honest to each other and sharing their personal issues and stories just fly over your head entirely? What “masculinity” are you talking about? Did you just turn off your brain during the personal conversations and then turn it back on during the properly coordinated gunfights (“video game” – really?)

    What about the whole historical dimension and political infighting within the Turkish government which results in the army and police being betrayed by their own leaders? And the values and behavior emphasized by the characters as a reflection of Turkish culture? The intimacy in the language (honorifics like “brother” and “sister”, the way characters respond to seniority, and so on).

    You don’t even bother to explain your expectations in your writeup or your criteria for reviewing the film and you already make a recommendation?

    Give me a break.

    Reply
  • January 16, 2019 at 7:28 pm
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    A complete review might have included the propaganda value of Anti-Fethullah rhetoric & paranoia, which tore my eye are the most convincing aspects of this show. Enjoyable enough, clearly in sync with the “deep-state”, truther & violent wish-fulfilment that converts vigilantism into a true patriot, protectionist motive.

    This series runs from target to target like a Tom Clancy-inspired shooter game (throwing in the often clumsy humanism/symbolism found in James Cameron/Michael Bay films) and – worst of all – a fatal dose of Enver Pasha’s absolutism, into a 6 episode blender that barely contains the inconsistent pacing and a football stadium’s level of self-awareness.

    The paranoid atmospherics leading up to July15th (one assumes of 2016) never include suggestions of the reactionary Nationalizing of the economy, the immanence of an internally-motivated purge engineered by the current power structure to silence any and all dissent – in fact, Börü suffers from a brittle and irrational tone of Nationalism as an altar to be fed blood. Any blood will serve, but given the show’s blurring of PKK, ISIL & bureaucracy to cloak the enemy, it leaves a lot of dramatic development untouched. There are a lot of likewise skeletal construction sets used for action scenes that serve as allegory for both the precarious economy, democracy and work still to be done, in the real world and in social growth.

    I liked the emotional core and Die Hard tributes of ep. 6. – some of the best character-focussed writing is present and most effective in this season 1 wrap up. The show does not lack heart, but it suffers from the lazy sort of argument made in most military/cop dramas, that becoming/remaining human (at & after war/work) is as impossible as living up to the motto “no mistakes”. What a silly code of conduct, to be sure.

    But this show is not about truth and virtue – or realism – in police/military procedure. It’s about how any state actor seeks the best formula for justifying paranoid and violent behavior (to consolidate power), no matter what the facts are – and terrorism becomes a “forever war” ingredient needed to keep the population/plot tense and the basic morality clear.

    For all this criticism, I think Turkish-produced drama may not get a better “insider” take on political machinery for the next decade. The perspective needed to make better sense of state actions can take generations – and Turkey has yet to come clean about the last century of militarism.

    Reply
  • July 25, 2020 at 4:38 am
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    PLEASE I WOULD LIKE SOMEBODY TO HELP ME FIND A CHANNEL OR SITE WHERE I CAN WATCH THE MOVIE OF BORU WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES. I GOT HOOKED WITH THE 6 CHAPTERS SERIES AND I DO NOT KNOW WHAT HAPPENED NEXT… I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT. EVEN IF IT IS NOT IN ENGLISH, IN TURKING AT LEAST I CAN SEE THE ACTION. PLEASE IF ANYONE HAS THE LINK, CAN YOU SHARE IT WITH ME? THANK YOU.
    MARISELA (MEXICO)

    Reply

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