‘The Last Hangover’ | Netflix Short Film Review This is what really happened.

4

Summary

The Last Hangover will anger some, but the short Netflix film gives a funny twist to The Last Supper story and the fate of Jesus.

I could imagine many religious sects watching Netflix’s The Last Hangover and feeling irrationally angry about its revamped version of events on Jesus’s Last Supper. As someone who does not follow any religion, it was refreshing to see a comedic version of God’s son, using particular moments in the Bible and turn them into gags. Of course, there is a moral line when it comes to material like this, and I am sure the creator of the short film finalised his work with a balanced heart. Or they didn’t give a ****.

The Last Hangover is about Jesus and The Last Supper, with his disciples all waking up at the supper table, all with dry mouths and hungover, wondering where God’s son is. As they drank so much the night before, they slowly piece the night together. I was highly amused that the short film made The Last Supper as Jesus’s way to have a drinking session; there is a breaking of bread and the night is chaos, with magical refillable wine and duplicated food. If Jesus were really like this, I’d have been his friend.

As the short movie progresses, the gags reveal what happened to Jesus, and as you can guess, with the Romans intruding on the party, the fate of Jesus is coming. However, The Last Hangover performs an unusual but hilarious twist with the story which will get the neutrals howling but the religious angrily clenching their fists in a fury. The Brazillian movie is worth a watch, and it will only take 44 minutes of your time. As Christmas looms, Netflix decided to release a parody of the story of Jesus. And what a great move that has turned out to be. The Last Hangover will not please the masses, but it is undoubtedly funny.

Daniel Hart

Daniel Hart is the Co-Founder of Ready Steady Cut and has operated as Editor-in-Chief since 2017.

5 thoughts on “‘The Last Hangover’ | Netflix Short Film Review

  • December 23, 2018 at 1:41 am
    Permalink

    I beleive it is extremely disrespectul to mock people and there religious beliefs. Would anyone make an entire movie to mock LGBT community or the rainbow flag- and release it during a pride parade? Would any one make a movie mocking events of the Quran or Prophet Mohammed and release it during Ramadan? Why then is the Bible being mocked so – and during Christmas??? I am a Bible beleiveing Christian.
    While I totally understand that it’s okay for people to disagree with the Bible and Christianity. Such opinions can be voiced without sheer mockery and disrespect especially during a Holy Season!!

    Reply
    • December 26, 2018 at 7:11 am
      Permalink

      Oh, but the answer to your question is really rather simple. LGBT people are real, gods are not. It is quite possible to hurt someone who is real and not possible at all to hurt someone who isn’t. And it is the job of educated people to ridicule that which is ridiculous. Your god is eternal and he created the entire Universe; how incredibly sensitive does he have to be to be offended by a comic short film (which, of course, he has always known about as he knows all past, present and future, does he not; so it’s not like he’s surprised)? You religious folk really are a joke ready-made.

      Reply
  • August 18, 2019 at 7:32 pm
    Permalink

    This movie put the funny back into religion. It was great and they weren’t mocking or making fun of anyone’s beliefs. This was comedians doing what comedians do,making us laugh out loud. My hat is off!

    Reply
  • Pingback: The First Temptation of Christ (Netflix) review: A worthy follow-up | RSC

  • December 11, 2019 at 4:32 pm
    Permalink

    THIS IS DISGUSTING TAKE IT DOWN !!!????

    Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: