‘Love, Death + Robots’ Episode 16 Review: “Ice Age” A window into another Universe.

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Summary

Love, Death + Robots Episode 16, “Ice Age”, follows a couple that watches a civilization grow in their fridge, which is bizarre yet enjoyable to watch.

Love, Death + Robots is a Netflix Anthology series created by Tim Miller and David Fincher. Here is the review for Episode 16, “Ice Age”, which will contain spoilers. You can read the spoiler-free review of the entire series by clicking these words. You can check out our archive for reviews of each episode by clicking these words.


I guess to remind us of where we are heading, “Ice Age” is the most appropriate animated story Love, Death + Robots can throw at us. As we are speeding up the ever-changing climate, Episode 16 moves away from animation and shows real-life actors to tell the story. The chapter is simple, short, kind of whimsical, but I liked it. As we reach the end of Love, Death + Robots it’s incredible how inventive the creators have been with this anthology.

In terms of the premise, Episode 16, “Ice Age”, is about a young couple moving into a dingy, old, New York-style apartment that has had its worse days. The couple joke about the amount of sex they are going to have, with the woman instantly bemused at her partner’s confidence in the idea. In the apartment, there is an old fridge, and they soon discover that it holds a civilization that is currently in the Ice Age.

The couple spends the night looking inside the fridge, where time runs differently, and quicker, so they witness this Universe go through different ages. At one point, civilization is operating in a full modern war, giving the couple time away from the fridge while it occurs. “Ice Age” has its predictable ending where the civilization runs its course, but it’s enjoyable all the same. What amazed me more is how the couple accepted all this was happening in their apartment, but as a short story, I guess it’s best to suspend your disbelief.

Daniel Hart

Daniel Hart is the Co-Founder of Ready Steady Cut and has operated as Editor-in-Chief since 2017.

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