The Feed Season 1 Review: An Absorbing Story About Brain Implants When Technology Goes Wrong

3.5

Summary

The Feed Season 1 presents a morally conflicting story about brain implants, giving us a glimpse into our possible future and how technology embeds in the human body.

This review of Amazon Series The Feed Season 1 contains no spoilers.

The Feed slowly surfaces a story regarding brain implant technology ending up in the wrong hands. The Amazon series introduces the audience to the Hatfield family, which revolves around the implant’s creator Lawrence and how their entire identity is based upon this technology named The Feed. Season 1 is a future where everything we take for granted in our smartphone becomes visible in your brain as applications; you can listen to music, call people, imagine a different world — all embedded in your brain.

The concept feels far from unrealistic, especially in the present-day where technology is aggressively evolving. The Feed toys with the narrative that creating such technology is the basis for evil. Allowing people to use it for their own agenda, rather than bettering the human race. Engrained in the story is this human need to have the brain implant, and those who oppose The Feed are seen as outlaws named the “resisters” whose common aim is to stop the technology.

I always find stories that involve technology and how it frames the moral compass absolutely fascinating. Like in the present day with social media, The Feed is seen as the problem, but we repeatedly forget that it is actually exposing us. As The Feed progresses its story, it is clear that the narrative is skirting towards a human error based on emotional outcomes, rather than “technology must be stopped”.

The characters take a while to bed in. The first two episodes mostly rely on the concept, with the lead characters doing their bed to immerse themselves into a mildly dystopian world. The Hatfield family all have varying personalities, but surprisingly they do not reek of wealth, and their common goal is to find out what is wrong with the brain implant solution.

There are darker episodes in The Feed, and some endings are especially shocking. The Amazon series has a habit of slowly burning the narrative within a chapter, to ultimately stun you at the finish line. The writers wanted the shock-factor, and sometimes it works.

The Feed Season 1 is by no means perfect, with the cast taking time to mature, but the sci-fi dystopian story has something to endure, and it is well worth a binge.

Our coverage of The Feed Season 1 does not stop here. You can read the recap of Episode 1 by clicking these words.

Daniel Hart

Daniel Hart is the Co-Founder of Ready Steady Cut and has operated as Editor-in-Chief since 2017.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: