Spree review – a darkly funny distraction I'll walk, thanks

August 16, 2020
Louie Fecou 0
Film, Film Reviews
4

Summary

You might forget this the minute you leave the theatre, but Spree is definitely worth a watch, especially if you have any interest in social media and the effects it has on the damaged stalwarts that inhabit its realm.

4

Summary

You might forget this the minute you leave the theatre, but Spree is definitely worth a watch, especially if you have any interest in social media and the effects it has on the damaged stalwarts that inhabit its realm.

Lockdown had probably seen quite an increase in the number of people on YouTube, and other services, watching vlogs… from people… doing stuff. The more popular the vlog, the more people want to watch, and we live in an era where the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” can be answered with, “A YouTuber.” So Spree, the name of an Uber-type app, follows the desperate, and insane, attempts by Kurt Kunkle to grow his following and become viral.

Directed by Eugene Kotlyarenko, the film is pretty much screened through the live feeds of the people that are inadvertently involved in Kurt’s bid for infamy, and the cameras that our sociopath has installed in his car so he can stream from every angle.

Needless to say, Kurt has pretty much lost his mind in his bid for internet fame, so with a hideous plan in motion, #thelesson, all one word, pretty much picking people up in his car and filming them meeting terrible ends, he sets off, hoping to gain the following of Bobby Base Camp, (BBC?), a hit YouTube celebrity that taunts him on his lack of content and originality.

Basically Spree is a series of set pieces, but the energy of Joe Keery who plays Kurt does manage to drive this film forward. Director Kotlyarenko also keeps his tongue in cheek, shocking us with the absurd violence while slyly winking to the audience.

As we get towards the third act, there are no great reveals to be had, but plot is not what this film excels in. Instead, it is a commentary on the fickle nature of social media and those that live their lives through it. Sure, it’s a pretty labored point at this stage, but Spree has a certain charm that helps it win the audience over.

The messages are hit you over the head obvious. Sasheer Vamata plays stand up comedian Jessie, who swerves into Kurt’s path and is pretty much as desperate as Kurt is to get followers and hits. It may be telling though that in reality, Sasheer has made attempts to try and distance herself from social media, using it much more sparingly.

So Spree is a darkly funny distraction that is helped by a great cast and some funny moments. There are some nasty scenes that should keep the horror fans happy and there are a few laughs to be had too. You might forget this the minute you leave the theatre, but Spree is definitely worth a watch, especially if you have any interest in social media and the effects it has on the damaged stalwarts that inhabit its realm.


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