Team Kaylie Part 2 Review: More of the Same Vacuous Drivel Smells Like Teen Spirit

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Summary

The same vacuous, tedious claptrap we suffered through in September, only one episode more of it.

In the spirit of Team Kaylie Part 2, and since I’m professionally obligated to do so regardless, allow me to remind you of what I already expressed at length in September, when the first five episodes of this show came out on Netflix: It’s garbage. It’s garbage for lots of reasons, some of which, for the sake of my word count, I’ll reiterate here. They still apply, thankfully, since Part 2’s sextuplets are virtually indistinguishable both from each other and the five that came before. It’s still built entirely on crass stereotypes masquerading as either subversions or — more cynically — much-needed representation, it still isn’t funny, and it still mines the most insufferably grating aspects of contemporary culture for gags that it can’t even be bothered to execute properly — and that the laugh track guffaws at regardless.

I must admit that I struggle to imagine who the audience for Team Kaylie Part 2 might be — better alternatives are hardly in short supply, even on Netflix, and it’s doing children a disservice to assume that they won’t quickly identify this for what it is, which is a waste of moderate talent and most certainly time that could be better spent on literally anything else. If there’s a genuine casualty of this show beyond me, I’d wager it’s the lead Bryana Salaz, who seems to have been sucked into an inescapable black hole of Netflix’s tween-focused programming, virtually all of which is terrible.

Six episodes of this claptrap is unreasonable, even if one of them is seasonal. It’s impossible for me to care and equally difficult to imagine why anyone else would. There’s nothing of value to be gained from its simplistic moralizing or boilerplate archetypes, and its hideously cheap and fake-looking sets have all the charm of a storefront window display, which I suppose in a sense is all Team Kaylie Part 2 is.


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Jonathon Wilson

Jonathon is the Co-Founder of Ready Steady Cut and has been Senior Editor and Chief Critic of the outlet since 2017.

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