Black Summer season 2 review – lacklustre in parts, brilliant in others Battling the winter.

June 16, 2021
Daniel Hart 3
Netflix, TV Reviews
3

Summary

Black Summer has encapsulated the intricacies of human flaws.

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3

Summary

Black Summer has encapsulated the intricacies of human flaws.

This review of Netflix’s Black Summer season 2 does not contain spoilers.

Maybe I was a tad harsh on Black Summer for its debut season. My main qualm was that it did not offer anything uniquely different. In a landscape of zombie interpretations, it’s expected that if a series like this is released, then it offers something that makes the audience pumped. People running away from zombies, attempting to reach a safe place is hardly inspiring, especially with the TWD universe keeping hold of the genre mantle.

And Black Summer season 2 has similar issues, with some chapters feeling conceptual and empty rather than blessed with a sublime narrative structure. However, there are a few gems in its second installment, and unlike season 1, I was suddenly invested in a few characters.

Season 2 is mostly about battling the wintery elements while keeping desperate humans at bay. This is a world that’s become increasingly morally corrupt, that even the most normal conversations feel tense. The writers have done marvelously in understanding the human condition; how regular stress and trauma on the brain can form an entirely new personality for a person, and normalize their ferocious environment. Black Summer has encapsulated the intricacies of human flaws.

Of course, the stand-out characters that draw the audience in the most are Rose (played by Jaime King) and her daughter Anna (played by Zoe Marlett). Bring your minds to the finale of season 1, and you’ll remember Rose finding her daughter in an empty stadium. The second season sees the two absorbing characters venture across snowy scapes to find an airstrip for a routine plane that can take them to safety. While Rose was a character of interest in season 1, her daughter fits in with ease in season 2. In fact, their relationship makes the second installment work. There are returning and new characters in season 2 that have the same objective, which complicates matters for everyone

Black Summer has a habit of using screen titles and storyboarding around a specific scenario. While I understand the creativity, it did not feel necessary at times to jump around a particular timeline; it felt slightly overkill in order to fill screen time. Especially on episodes where nothing much really happens.

Season 2 feels like a better installment, and by the end, the writers managed to sell a third season. Despite being frustrated at various plot points, and lackluster chapters, the penultimate chapter, and the finale secure Black Summer as a story that can be extended. Hopefully, Netflix does not place it under its regularly used guillotine.

What are your thoughts on Netflix’s Black Summer season 2? Comment below. 

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3 thoughts on “Black Summer season 2 review – lacklustre in parts, brilliant in others

  • June 24, 2021 at 2:16 am
    Permalink

    OMG, what a joke having to scroll down , way down to try and make a comment on the review of Black Summer. Well, I”m not. too damn much.

  • June 29, 2021 at 10:22 pm
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    Biggest piece of crap I’ve watched in a long time. I’ve been looking forward to season 2, but seriously wtf was that?! The non linear story telling didn’t serve any purpose other than to make it unnecessarily confusing. The whole thing seemed like it was just trying to be clever for the sake of being clever. The characters are all so poorly developed not only didd I not care what happened to them i couldn’t even tell most of them apart. The could’ve switched cat around at any point and I wouldn’t have noticed. This was all on top of some terrible sound mixing that made left my friends and I having to adjust the volume with every single scene.

  • July 3, 2021 at 3:06 pm
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    Fully agree with Ginger. The randomized timeline adds little to the storytelling. We really don’t know who we should be “rooting for”, so turning off the TV several times seemed very attractive and finally I did that. Many of the characters are similar, and the writers want to make it more realistic but making them all vicious killers is really not something anybody hopes for the apocalypse.

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