Wu-Tang: An American Saga season 2 review – a rich second instalment The history is important.

September 8, 2021
Daniel Hart 0
Hulu, TV Reviews
4

Summary

If audiences believed season 1 was a vibe, then it only gets better.

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4

Summary

If audiences believed season 1 was a vibe, then it only gets better.

This review of Hulu’s Wu-Tang: An American Saga season 2 does not contain spoilers. This review is based on the first three episodes. The series is airing weekly.

The fact that Wu-Tang: An American Saga secured a second season highlights the prestige and history the famous hip hop group holds. There’s a story to tell and one that surpasses a single feature-length film. I’ve noted for a while that hip-hop history deserves more TV material. It’s rich and important, so the success of this series is hardly a surprise. The drama returns, and it’s a grand re-entry into this world.

Like the first season, Wu-Tang: An American Saga understands what is at stake, which is no surprise when you observe the people behind the show. The first three episodes of season 2 bring a grey area for our real-life lead characters; an area of limbo. You only get one life, and you can feel it in the writing. The era they are in, which is compounded by the drug trade as an easier route, is coupled with the desire to make a true name for themselves. There’s anxiety seeping in season 2 — crossing the line on either side is milliseconds away.

Of course, any hip-hop fan understands where Wu-Tang Clan ended up and hailed as one of the best hip-hop groups of all time, but that does not mean their journey isn’t important. Bobby Diggs, aka The RZA, is central to the opening story arc; a genius in the making but on the precipice of spending his life in jail. The second season serves as a cold reminder of how the group may never have formed without the influential Bobby. It makes even more sense when you learn that the American rapper is one of the series creators.

Wu-Tang: An American Saga season 2 blesses the audience with the times, bringing lyrics to provide context to particular scenes, and gracing viewers with beats to bring an abundance of nostalgia. If audiences believed season 1 was a vibe, then it only gets better.

Of course, as I write this review, I’m only three episodes in, so I’m unclear on whether it angles at the third season. But I wouldn’t be surprised. Hulu has garnered a historical story, and I only hope this spurs on more hip-hop stories created into series. Season 2 is worth the investment.

What did you think of Hulu’s Wu-Tang: An American Saga season 2? Comment below. 

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