The Walking Dead: World Beyond season 2 premiere recap – “Konsekans”

October 4, 2021
Jonathon Wilson 0
AMC, Weekly TV
2

Summary

“Konsekans” is packed with many of the same issues that blighted the first season, which suggests that neither the show nor its characters have grown up enough to be entertaining.

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2

Summary

“Konsekans” is packed with many of the same issues that blighted the first season, which suggests that neither the show nor its characters have grown up enough to be entertaining.

This recap of The Walking Dead: World Beyond season 2 premiere, “Konsekans”, contains spoilers.


“Konsekans” begins, according to a title card, SIX WEEKS AGO, which is one day after Monument Day, with Elizabeth on a hillside rather coldly finessing the eradication of CRM colonies — those at Omaha and Nebraska State University, the destruction of which was alluded to in the first season’s finale — by leading a giant horde of walkers to the gates and blowing open the walls with explosives. This, she claims, is just the beginning. Of what? We don’t know yet. But, knowing this show, it probably won’t be good — in more ways than one.

The Walking Dead: World Beyond season 2 premiere recap

Do pardon my cynicism, obviously. I’m always open to being pleasantly surprised. But the fact that we venture right into stupid territory straight away is not a good sign. Instead of Elizabeth taking Hope to her father as she promised, she instead drops her off on a rooftop in Albany, New York, where she pretends that the destruction of the colonies was just a tragic accident and that they did everything they could, and then sends Hope on a “field trip”. She’s set free, basically, armed, and asked to make her own decision whether to go her own way or join the CRM of her own volition. The word “genius” keeps being thrown around, which continues to amuse me. The cold open made a point that Huck was kept in the dark about the plan to destroy the colonies, and she obviously had no idea about this either, since she rightly points out that this decision completely invalidates everything she did to get Hope here in the first place. Nevertheless, and expectedly, Hope decides to give things a go on her own.

Meanwhile, Will explains how he survived the destruction of the colonies, and takes Iris and Felix to “The Perimeter”, a former farm town turned into an artist colony, to introduce them to Indira, the head of the council that runs the place. She has a cozy arrangement with the CRM and is risking everything by harboring them, so Will cautions Iris and Felix against any rash actions that might put everyone in danger — including attempting to rescue Hope. He wants to play “the long game”, which in this show seems like more of a threat than a tactical maneuver.

Case in point: Hope’s adventures in Albany. It all just feels like such a waste of time. She’s thrown down a flight of stairs by the very first walker she encounters and splits her head open wide enough to cause a concussion and plunge everything into a hallucinatory melange of ideas that are clearly supposed to mean something but end up just being a flurry of trite visuals. In the meantime, Huck and Elizabeth debate the merits of the whole endeavor, and while this conversation reveals some important details — Silas has been recovered and interrogated but is revealing nothing; Elizabeth is still on the hunt for the others because if they persist on wanting to rescue Leo and now Hope they’ll need to be “dealt with” — it doesn’t manage to justify this excursion. The point of Huck taking Hope across the country on foot was that the experience would change her enough that she’d be compliant. After all that, why is Elizabeth so adamant that this one extra experience will suddenly determine her entire personality?

What’s even more annoying is that it works. At the first sign of difficulty Hope just radios Elizabeth and tells her she’s ready to come along. It’s implied that the real test was for Huck, to see whether she’d go after her charge, but I’m not buying that either. Almost none of this makes any sense, on a logical or character level. It’s just padding, plain and simple. Of course, Hope doesn’t change her perspective at all and confesses as much to Huck — who is trying to convince her not to reveal how badly her mission really went — in the very next scene. She knew she couldn’t make it on her own, so took the only way out that was offered to her. A young girl not wanting to die on a dirty staircase in Albany is not the same thing as a young girl deciding to build a future with an organization that is flagrantly immoral. The fact that nobody susses this out is perplexing to me.

And then there’s Iris. At the Perimeter, she’s reminded explicitly not to rock the boat for the good of everyone, then slips out in the night and kills a CRM soldier. If nothing else, it’s an important turning point for her as a character, since she has figured out that the CRM deliberately destroyed the colonies and is clearly keen to take her revenge. But it once again requires her to do the exact opposite of what she’s advised to do by people much more capable than she is — which is the kind of frustratingly immature decision-making that powered the first season. It would have been nice for the show to grow up a little. The Walking Dead: World Beyond‘s Season 2 premiere, though, suggests it hasn’t.

You can stream The Walking Dead: World Beyond season 2, episode 1, “Konsekans”, right now on AMC.

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