Coming Out Colton season 1 review – a bit cringe but a relevant story

December 3, 2021
Romey Norton 0
Netflix, Streaming Service, TV Reviews
3

Summary

Bachelor Alum Colton Underwood takes us through his experience of coming out as gay.

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3

Summary

Bachelor Alum Colton Underwood takes us through his experience of coming out as gay.

Netflix reality series Coming Out Colton season 1 came out on the streaming service on December 3, 2021. 

If you’re not aware, Underwood is a memorable three-time star on the ABC hit Bachelor franchise. First appearing on The Bachelorette in 2018, and he later led his own Bachelor season in 2019. Underwood was openly a virgin during his run on these seasons, leaving his season in a relationship with his winner Cassie Randolph. In 2020 Randolph had a restraining order on Underwood, and he came out months after. Underwood mentions Randolph a lot in this series and she does not make an appearance throughout.

There is a lot of back-story drama to Netflix’s Coming Out Colton and if you aren’t already aware of it, you might find this boring or get a little lost.

This series follows Underwood during the run-up to the famous Good Morning America interview where he revealed to the world that he was gay. It documents his feelings before the breakthrough interview, where he frets about how his parents, siblings, friends, former football coaches, and more will receive the news before going public.

Each episode has a theme, from “friends” to “football” to “family” — soft, somber music, clear shots of the high-life, mixed with serious interviews and coming out stories I am sure are meant to provoke emotion from the viewer, but I found it all quite trivial. It must be very difficult to come out for some people, but in this case, everyone was supportive and the 6 episodes felt dragged out.

This series is all about Underwood being accountable and realizing his mistakes, so it is one big apology, a this-is-me series. I do appreciate the vulnerability that people show in these types of series, but I also think it’s one giant publicity stunt. But, hey. If you can make money off your misery, why not? Being a reality star, athlete, and Christian in America, it is hard to hear when he says that he thought he would die with this secret. Which says a lot more about his circle and those industries than it does himself. What I do like is that Underwood is using his high profile and Netflix’s high profile to highlight deeply rooted political issues. He addresses thoughts of suicide, homophobia and shows that men can be vulnerable and that’s okay. If this series can help someone who feels alone, confused, closed off, and is struggling, then it serves a bigger, better purpose than just being another reality TV series.

Whilst there are some positives to this series, I also feel as if this wasn’t made for any “good reasons”, it’s a chance for Underwood to explain himself and probably gain some sympathy and change the narrative of what we have seen in the media surrounding him. For example, what is interesting is that this series had a Change.org petition for it to be canceled because of Colton’s stalking allegations. Here he can attempt to change his public image and build a better reputation for himself, maybe.

If you’re a fan of Colton’s, then watch this series. If you like drama, gossip and want to catch up, definitely watch. If you have no idea, then don’t bother. It’s a reality star talking about his life for 30 mins each episode, you’re not missing out on anything you won’t see in a gossip magazine later in the year. 

This series is very much like Caitlyn Jenner’s I Am Cait. So, if you enjoyed that series, you would enjoy this one. Overall, Underwood makes his point, shares his side of his story, shares his life and for that, I can say good for him.

What did you think of the Netflix reality series Coming Out Colton season 1? Comment below. 

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