Ozark season 4, part 2 review – the Byrde family’s final bid for freedom brings sobering truths

April 29, 2022
Daniel Hart 1
Netflix, Streaming Service, TV Reviews
4.5

Summary

Season 4, part 2 offers the lucrative notion that the Byrde family can reach any heights, or they could stew in the depths of Hell.

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4.5

Summary

Season 4, part 2 offers the lucrative notion that the Byrde family can reach any heights, or they could stew in the depths of Hell.

This review of Netflix’s Ozark season 4, part 2, does not contain spoilers.

Ozark has long been known as the counterpart to Breaking Bad, pushing the limits on what the typical human can bring to the world in a sobering fashion. Netflix’s staple series has been donned by the patient and well-sewn writing, bringing plenty of hard-hitting dialogue and scene-setting monologues. Fans will ask, “why end it now?” The most honest response is — end it while you can. Too many series write themselves into a hole, frustrating viewers with conclusive plot points that stretch character development too thin.

Ozark can be accused of not stretching the character development enough at times. But the monstrous transformation of Wendy is a terrifying case study of how to mold a character into a world not suited for her. On the other hand, Marty remains consistent in behavior, which is equally terrifying because it’s difficult to sense what he’s truly capable of. Season 4, part 2 offers the lucrative notion that the Byrde family can reach any heights, or they could stew in the depths of Hell.

Ozark had fourteen episodes to articulate the Byrde family’s final bid for freedom in season 4. Netflix strayed away from the usual six to ten-episode model to give the team behind the series time to get their point across. To allow the characters to breathe through their ending. Part 2 of season 4 is not a cheery swansong or a procession to celebrate these characters. Audiences will be reeling with tension right up to the final second. There’s an abundance of gratitude that I have to offer here; I’m appreciative that the series did not perform a farewell tour, which many series fall into the trap of, rather than giving the sobering truths of the story.

And I suppose that’s what comes to mind in Ozark season 4, part 2, the sobering truths. The final bid for freedom raises plenty of questions about how our universe is manufactured. For instance, can life be fair? Can evil people win? Do the wronged get their comeuppance? The truth behind the final bid for freedom, heralded by Wendy, and operated by Marty, is that there’s a weight of darkness to it regardless of whether they win that bid or not. Their existence in the Ozarks alone has caused pain and misery.

The final journey of Ozark is not really about whether the family succeeds in their ambitions, but it’s about the painful reality of the life we live. It zeroes in on the infinity of human capability in the most destructive way, ripping away the vision of a balanced universe. Maybe there are no laws. Perhaps the world is a playground ready to be played with. Ozark battles with the conundrum of morality but, at the same time, recognizes that there is no real “good versus evil.” That’s a concept. It’s an ideology constructed over many years, diverting from our animalistic tendencies.

Part 2 of season 4 throws a few curveballs, but its character-centric focus is the gamechanger. It’s not about crazy twists or the one last moment. Instead, the final seven episodes recognize where the characters are and their relationship with each other. That’s the main contributor to the success of part 2.

And so, Ozark ends, and while fans will debate the key moments and whether or not it served them, there’s a solid argument to suggest that the ending does not matter at all.

You can watch this series with a subscription to Netflix.

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1 thought on “Ozark season 4, part 2 review – the Byrde family’s final bid for freedom brings sobering truths

  • May 1, 2022 at 6:07 am
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    Excellent series of recaps Mr. Hart. I loved reading you.

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