Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes season 1 review – a grim but funny modern-day vampire story

August 25, 2021
Daniel Hart 3
Netflix, TV Reviews
4

Summary

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes can be applauded for its take on a modern-day vampire story.

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4

Summary

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes can be applauded for its take on a modern-day vampire story.

This review of Netflix’s Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes season 1 does not contain spoilers. 

Read the ending explained for the series. 

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes is certainly a dark horse on the streaming service — it presents a modern-day vampire story. One that is coated in grim reality, with a tinge of goriness, confusion, and comedy. It’s not a story that thrusts the viewer into the world of blood-thirsty monsters, which is surprising because, in 6 episodes, it somehow manages to space out the writing with the plot and character development.

Following a family that runs their own funeral parlor business, the concept is that “No One Dies In Skarnes,” which is the reason they are failing to make ends meet. The story flips on its head when one of the family members, Live (played by Kathrine Thorborg Johansen), is presumed dead. The first shock of the story is how Live suddenly comes to life when forensics checks her body. The investigative community tries to play it off as extreme hypothermia, but viewers will find themselves absorbed from the first chapter. What does Live represent?

Before discussing Live, it’s important to note how this story sets itself up. The Netflix series sets itself in a small Norwegian town. It feels incestuous by nature. Not because the locals all know each other’s business, but by the assumption that “not much happens”. Even the police department looks extremely bored, represented by two buddy cops in Judith (played by Kim Fairchild) and Reinert (played by André Sørum). By environment and this emphasis on space, there’s this eery knowingness that if anything did happen in the town, there would be a sense of denial. It’s the perfect environment for a modern-day vampire to be conflicted by their actions.

And that’s why Live is a difficult character to gauge, but also fascinating. By definition, she is not a bad person, but her nature dismantles her. Her discovery to understanding who she revels in trauma and violent realization. Kathrine Thorborg Johansen does marvelously well to bundle through life, providing scope to what it means to be this different person and where she fits into the general population.
But coupled with the thriller-vibe, Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes pulls off dark comedy. The characters are not surface-level funny, but the script assumes humor that allows the audience to realise the realism but the absurdity at the same time. The kooky perspective of a family-run funeral business really provides an edge; the irony that a vampire exists from within this group of people.
Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes can be applauded for its take on a modern-day vampire story. It shines with confidence, and audiences will feel thrilled by the concept.
What do you think of Netflix’s Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes season 1? Comment below. 
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3 thoughts on “Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes season 1 review – a grim but funny modern-day vampire story

  • September 9, 2021 at 1:17 pm
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    Loved it, and I’m not a ” vampire enthusiast”. The show is humorous at times and certainly keeps one wondering how LIve’s dilemma is going to pan out. Five stars!

  • September 30, 2021 at 11:14 pm
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    It’s absolutely brilliant. It is the b*****d love child that would result if “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo “ had a three way with “Shaun of the Dead” and “Six Feet Under.” All of the characters have depth that makes the twists and turns of the storyline all the more jarring (in a great way), and the dark humor all the more amusing. Great performances all around. Can’t believe it isn’t getting more attention.

  • October 10, 2021 at 4:47 pm
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    great series

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