Green Mothers’ Club season 1, episode 6 recap – “A Letter From the Dead”

April 22, 2022
Daniel Hart 0
K-Drama, Netflix, Streaming Service, Weekly TV
4

Summary

Episode 6 elevates the story to a new level as a death in the neighborhood changes things forever.

View all
4

Summary

Episode 6 elevates the story to a new level as a death in the neighborhood changes things forever.

This recap of Netflix K-Drama series Green Mothers’ Club season 1, episode 6, “A Letter From the Dead,” contains spoilers.

Read the recap of the previous episode.

After that extremely shocking ending in episode 5, we are now faced with a depressing chapter, a looming mystery between the mothers. Suddenly, Green Mothers’ Club feels like a conspiracy, with plenty facing the women and their futures.

Green Mothers’ Club season 1, episode 6 recap

Episode 6 opens with Eun-pyo finding Jin-ha’s dead body in the rain. A sad and tragic moment in the story with a character committing suicide. There’s a sense of disbelief in the neighborhood. When Jin-ha’s partner sees what has happened, he keels over in despair. It’s difficult to judge this moment — the truth behind Jin-ha’s suicide is a troubling search for the truth.

Chun-hui finds a shocked Eun-pyo in the rain where the tragic event has happened. Eun-pyo is stricken with trauma, believing it’s her fault for Jin-ha’s death. Her wails are upsetting to hear. She tells Chun-hui that Jin-ha got the wrong idea about her and Louis, but her husband didn’t want her to know that he was looking for a ghostwriter. Chun-hui tries to reassure Eun-pyo that it isn’t her fault and advises that she doesn’t tell anyone, including the police, about her past with the deceased woman. This is strange in itself — Chun-hui seems wildly invested in keeping things secret.

There’s a police investigation in episode 6. Eun-pyo gives a simple statement at the police station initially but then reveals she used to know Jin-ha from university. Luckily, her partner is one of the police officers, so they take it easy on her. When Chun-hui is investigated, she explains how Jin-ha called her when she died, saying she felt down and brought up her mother’s death.

Eun-pyo learns from the police that the last person Jin-ha was with before she died was Chun-hui. And then Eun-pyo remembers Jin-ha warning her about Chun-hui because she has a “dark side.” She finds a letter addressed to Chun-hui from Jin-ha. It states she will not forget her wicked deeds. She confronts Chun-hui about the letter and wants answers. Chun-hui feels she is being investigated by her and tells Eun-pyo that Jin-ha was upset with her and that’s what they talked about before they died. This rattles Eun-pyo even more.

The next day, a calmer Eun-pyo meets Chun-hui and asks for clarity about what was said when she met Jin-ha. She reveals her husband is one of the police officers. Chun-hui feels lied to and walks away from her. Eun-pyo meets Louis and asks if Jin-ha had the wrong idea about her and him and whether it led to her suicide. Louis gets angry, wondering why any of it matters now.

The ending

As the episode ends, desperation seeps in as Chun-hui uses Eun-pyo’s woes to her advantage.

On the way into the apartment building, Eun-pyo’s partner bumps into Chun-hui. She slyly tells the man that Jin-ha said to her (on the night she died) that her husband was having an affair with a friend of hers from university and that they recently met in the neighborhood. The elevator doors open, and Eun-pyo stands there. There’s trouble afoot.

Episode 6 elevates the story to a new level as a death in the neighborhood changes things forever.

Additional points

  • The police meet Jin-ha’s stepmother to try and confirm whether Jin-ha’s mother also committed suicide.
  • Yun-ju tells Eun-pyo that their children have been accepted into the Gifted Students Programme, and she laughs about Chun-hui’s child not getting in.

What did you think of Green Mothers’ Club season 1, episode 6? Comment below.

You can watch this K-Drama with a subscription to Netflix.

View all

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.