Love, Death + Robots season 3, episode 9 recap – “Jibaro”

May 20, 2022
Jonathon Wilson 19
Netflix, Streaming Service, TV, TV Recaps
4

Summary

“Jibaro” is a potent metaphor for sexual assault and male entitlement told through visual design and interpretive dance.

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4

Summary

“Jibaro” is a potent metaphor for sexual assault and male entitlement told through visual design and interpretive dance.

This recap of Love, Death + Robots season 3, episode 9, “Jibaro”, contains spoilers. You can check out all of our coverage of this show by clicking these words.


Completely devoid of dialogue and communicating entirely through visual storytelling and interpretive dance, “Jibaro” is a potent metaphor for male dominance and sexual violence told by reworking the siren myth, that old Greek tale of songstresses luring sailors to their deaths.

Love, Death + Robots season 3, episode 9 recap

Admittedly it’s hard to be sure exactly what “Jibaro” is trying to say, but I got that unmistakable feeling of violation and entitlement from one sequence in particular, and from there the episode seemed to morph into a kind of arthouse rape-revenge thriller. It’s open to interpretation, of course, but that was mine.

An intriguing hook is that one of the characters here, a knight among a party who’re hunting the siren, is deaf, leading initially to a stalemate and then a one-on-one battle that quickly turns sexual and then violent. This interpretation of the siren is covered in jewels, and after knocking her out, the knight rips them from her body, taking her wealth by force, claiming it as his own, and then tossing her aside as if she were nothing beyond that which he had already taken from her by force.

You see where I’m getting this whole sexual assault angle from, I’m sure.

Anyway, the knight makes the mistake of drinking from the water, which restores his hearing and makes him susceptible to the siren. Now stripped of her jewels and trinkets, she enacts her screaming revenge as the river runs red with blood.

You can stream Love, Death + Robots season 3, episode 9, “Jibaro”, exclusively on Netflix.

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19 thoughts on “Love, Death + Robots season 3, episode 9 recap – “Jibaro”

  • May 20, 2022 at 11:43 pm
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    Sorry was I supposed to feel sorry for her, after she was seen MURDERING AN ENTIRE GROUP OF PEOPLE?! Sorry but no, I don’t feel sorry for her and this entry was the weakest of the season. Just like season 1’s “The Witness,” (which is from the same individual) Jibaro isn’t high quality animation but rather god awful camera work filled with extreme closeups combined with even worse editing. Soggy Karen deserved what she got, the homicidal bint.
    If you want to talk about an allegory, hows bout the poor guy going through first the terror and then joy of gaining the ability to hear, just to have it used against him by the violent lake ho with an inner ear problem.
    At least Kill Team Kill was fun and funny.

    • May 20, 2022 at 11:50 pm
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      Soggy Karen hahaha.

  • May 21, 2022 at 12:14 am
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    Unreal, the immortal woman who has gold and gems for skin killed off an army of men, then laid with a deaf man while he was unconscious. When he woke, she aggressively forced him to be sexual to the point of bleeding yet this person says it is a metaphor for male dominance? If anything I’d say it shows that greed or want leads to your downfall. They chased the jewels into deep water and drowned under the weight of their armor. Then when the deaf man peeled the gems from her skin and it killed her, it led to results of the same ending.

  • May 21, 2022 at 12:18 am
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    “male entitlement” and “sexual assualt” after the ^”soggy karen” murdert a buntch of knights that where on a mission.
    No where did it even seem like they were after her in the first place. If they knew she existed they would have only send people that cant hear.
    Its just a Storry about a bunch of knights with one being greedy till his death.
    No sexual assualt he didnt even care for her body at all. He cared fort he gold. And thats just robbery and not some deep thinking against “male entitlement”
    Thats the most stupid s**t ive read about the episode so far.

  • May 21, 2022 at 1:57 am
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    The nuance, metaphors and artistry are wasted on people with such surface level views who were brave enough to share their less than incompetent comprehension of Jibaro.
    Your argument that the siren “deserved” what she got is exactly why those soldiers were driven away or drowned by her mania inducing screams.
    The “male entitlement” theme is based on the men who have been pursuing the siren/gold entity because they know she is covered in jewels and gold. They are there to strip this away from her. The siren is a protector of herself, she only attacks when provoked; she starts shrieking when the deaf soldier takes a piece of gold from the lake, which is a literal piece of her body, and claims it as his own.
    She lay next to him after he was the last one standing out of curiosity. The deaf soldier awakes, she is startled and tries to leave, he pulls her arm and consequently her gold gets stuck in his hand – he remembers she is the source of the jewels and gold so chases her. She playfully looks back because there is an element of innocence – remember she is protecting herself. Also she’s literally a f*****g mythological entity – what human is encrusted in jewels and has gold skin? They meet each other half way at the edge of the waterfall and she trusts him – hence the eroticism and sexuality. As she has her arms around him he continues plucking her gold skin because he feels entitled to her body. And that’s when she attacks again, this time through deadly kisses. It, again, is a counter attack.
    After deceiving her and literally headbutting her, he defiles her body, claiming her body as his own in his entitlement and greed. Seeing her through an objectifying lens. Unsure if you are capable of following through this far but this should be a breakdown of the depth of this episode.
    It appears the lake is her lifeline, and as she rebuilds herself in the bloodshed lake the power of this also gives the gift of hearing to the once deaf soldier. As she is regaining strength she uses her power to protect herself again and banish another soldier who attempted to strip away her power.
    This is an incredibly strong and visually stunning story. The animation, lighting and storyline are captivating. There’s absolutely no dialogue whatsoever yet delivers a profoundly deep story simply through interpretative dance and, of course, animation.
    Curios that you would choose to leave a bitchy comment instead of appreciating not only the message but unique story-telling.

  • May 21, 2022 at 2:40 am
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    The nuance, metaphors and artistry are wasted on people with such surface level views who were brave enough to share their less than incompetent comprehension of Jibaro.
    Your argument that the siren “deserved” what she got is exactly why those soldiers were driven away or drowned by her mania inducing screams.
    The “male entitlement” theme is based on the men who have been pursuing the siren/gold entity because they know she is covered in jewels and gold. They are there to strip this away from her. That is why they are there. The siren is a mere protector of herself, she only attacks when provoked; she starts shrieking when the deaf soldier takes a piece of gold from the lake, which is a literal piece of her body, and claims it as his own.
    She lay next to him after he was the last one standing out of curiosity. The deaf soldier awakes, she is startled and tries to leave but he pulls her arm and consequently her gold gets stuck in his hand – he remembers she is the source of the jewels and gold so chases her. She playfully looks back because there is an element of innocence – remember she is protecting herself. Also she’s literally a f*****g mythological entity – what human is encrusted in jewels and has gold skin? They meet each other half way at the edge of the waterfall and she trusts him – hence the eroticism and sexuality theme. As she has her arms around him he continues plucking her gold skin because he feels entitled to her body. And that’s when she attacks again, this time through deadly kisses. It, again, is a counter move.
    After deceiving her and literally headbutting her, this is when he defiles her body, claiming her body as his own in his own entitlement and greed. Seeing her through an objectifying lens. Unsure if you are capable of following through this far but this should be a breakdown of the depth of this episode.
    It appears the lake is her lifeline, and as she rebuilds herself in the bloodshed lake the power of this also gives the the gift of hearing to the once deaf soldier. As she is regaining strength she uses her power to protect herself again and banish another soldier who attempted to strip away her power.
    This is an incredibly strong and visually stunning story. The animation, lighting and storyline are captivating. There’s absolutely no dialogue whatsoever yet delivers profoundly deep story simply through art and interpretive dance.
    Curios that you would choose to leave a snarky comment instead of appreciating not only the message but unique story-telling.

  • May 21, 2022 at 7:29 am
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    What a stupid review.

  • May 21, 2022 at 7:33 am
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    Comment by Cabana is simply ignorant.

  • May 21, 2022 at 7:55 am
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    @Cabana sounds like a dipshit that just got out of the military and works at WalMart.

  • May 21, 2022 at 11:21 am
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    Sexual Violence and Male Dominance??…I’m sorry to say this but your take is pure a*s. The story just centers on greed and what you can lose when you give in to it. The soldiers died because he touched her gold and even when he survived and found out what taking the gold did to her body he didn’t care because he was a greedy b*****d. We’re still unsure that the conquistadors came there for her though cos how can we prove that?

  • May 21, 2022 at 11:40 am
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    Jonathan Wilson, i see what you are saying. And i can for sure see the same themes in the episode. But the siren attacked first. There is nothing to indicate the group has prior knowledge of her. They seem disinterested in the water until she attacks.

    Anything that happens after she murders them all, is wholly self-inflicted. Jibaro may be greedy, but it could also just be revenge and recompense for the families with lost fathers etc.

    If the whole take of this story is “male dominance and greed” without consideration of the females actions, this story is misandrist. And weak.

  • May 21, 2022 at 12:28 pm
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    As you say, it’s open to interpretation, but I think you’re reading far too much into a simple tale of grotesqueness. Perhaps the “conquistadores” were there for the siren, perhaps they were not. The deaf knight certainly seems surprised to find gold in the river. The metaphor you describe is, in my opinion, one that panders to the current decadent western zeitgeist. It’s as silly as some of the adolescent comments here indicating that she “attacks first” and deserves her fate, comments that are simplistic (as well as simple) and seem to represent some sort of deficient “incel” perspective, diametrically opposite of the apologetic “simp” narrative you’re spinning in order to get attention from fourth wave feminists.

    The story is simple. A siren defends her domain. A deaf knight is unaffected by her charms. She is intrigued by him, he unwittingly beguiles her with his uniqueness. He takes her gold skin and leaves her for dead. The environment reacts to her pain and heals her, healing the knight as well. Her powers, now able to entice him, drown him like the rest. It is like many tales in folklore and mythology. If we want to take a stab at speaking for the filmmakers, perhaps the metaphor is more universal, one of greed and power being ultimately powerless and unimportant when compared with regenerative Nature. That mistreating our world is simply hurting ourselves.

    Or perhaps it simply is what it is: a visually stunning tale of a greedy man that is offered love and chooses not to accept it. A short film pushing the boundaries of current technology way passed the far side of the uncanny valley. Perhaps she is Echo to his Narcissus. Not a perfect parallel, but there you have it.

    But really, take your male entitlement nonsense and peddle your idiocy elsewhere, this website is all full up.

  • May 21, 2022 at 12:31 pm
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    As you say, it’s open to interpretation, but I think you’re reading far too much into a simple tale of grotesqueness. Perhaps the “conquistadores” were there for the siren, perhaps they were not. The deaf knight certainly seems surprised to find gold in the river. The metaphor you describe is, in my opinion, one that panders to the current decadent western zeitgeist. It’s as silly as some of the adolescent comments here indicating that she “attacks first” and deserves her fate, comments that are simplistic (as well as simple) and seem to represent some sort of deficient “incel” perspective, diametrically opposite of the apologetic “simp” narrative you’re spinning in order to get attention from fourth wave feminists.

    The story is simple. A siren defends her domain. A deaf knight is unaffected by her charms. She is intrigued by him, he unwittingly beguiles her with his uniqueness. He takes her gold skin and leaves her for dead. The environment reacts to her pain and heals her, healing the knight as well. Her powers, now able to entice him, drown him like the rest. It is like many tales in folklore and mythology. If we want to take a stab at speaking for the filmmakers, perhaps the metaphor is more universal, one of greed and power being ultimately powerless and unimportant when compared with regenerative Nature. That mistreating our world is simply hurting ourselves. Perhaps she is Echo to his Narcissus. Not a perfect parallel, but there you have it.

    Or perhaps it simply is what it is: a visually stunning tale of a greedy man that is offered love and chooses not to accept it. A short film pushing the boundaries of current technology, taking us way passed the far side of the uncanny valley.

    But really, take your male entitlement nonsense and peddle your penile guilt elsewhere, this website is all full up.

  • May 22, 2022 at 12:46 am
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    Man this episode was was deep filled with intrig blood dance and the music was incredible

  • May 22, 2022 at 1:02 am
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    The knight only wanted gold. This is no tale about mistreatment of women or none of that nonsense. It was just greed. If they had had sex I bet they knight would have lost his dick, didn’t you notice how he got cut in the mouth when SHE forced herself on him?

  • May 22, 2022 at 5:06 am
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    In my humble opinion Jibaro is the brief story of Exploration(!) Age. Columbus,Cortez and many others. There is no
    winner. Visual expression of brutally greed. This a modern masterpiece well done.

  • May 23, 2022 at 1:26 pm
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    Anyone can actually *read* Alberto Mielgo’s viewpoint on the story, as its creator. Just google it…
    But in short, he says they are *both* bad, separately, and definitely with each other. They share a kind of romance, for a bit, but it is a bad romance. Neither is harmless regarding the events of the story, and even though she survives, both have lost.

  • May 23, 2022 at 8:30 pm
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    ah yes….the soldiers where sent to kill the siren…..wait….and the robed men? What where they doing there? Why where the soldiers kneeling to them? I think it’s to let the audience know they weren’t there for the siren. They had other business to attend. The unknowing deaf soldier merely ‘found’ a piece of Gold and was literally minding his own business looking for more gold. The siren could have misinterpreted it and believed the men came to steal her gold. Always these bitches assuming things…So she then proceeded to kill them all. Still wouldn’t explain why she would then sleep next to the soldier if she thinks he is after her gold since he was the only soldier that even picked up a piece of gold. Really am waiting for a feminist to try to explain that. As long as it’s shiny and glittery, it can’t be evil right? Well turns out he WAS only after her gold. Maybe a little revenge as well because of his expression when he double crossed her. But another thing feminists also seem to forget was her love was also going to kill him. If a kiss made his entire mouth bleed I hate to imagine what actual intercourse would do to little Jibaro. Funny how all these feminists see is an evil monster that resembles a woman crying and hurt and their misandry turns on. This season finale was stunning and well acted and edited. I enjoyed every minute of watching. Had to watch it a few times to notice most details. Like how in the end the bottom of the lake is filled with far more corpses than the soldiers in the beginning. A Siren is known to captivate and draw men exclusively to their deaths. And I’ve read idiots in these comments using high sophisticated and very complicated words defending the Siren.

  • May 24, 2022 at 12:21 pm
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    You have no bloody idea what you talking about, and from the comments here everyone agrees. Read comments and get an actual understanding

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